Frequently Asked Questions

About the RMIT Research Repository

What is the RMIT Research Repository?
What document types are included in the RMIT Research Repository?
How are Book, Book Chapter, Conference Paper, Commissioned Report and Journal Article records created in the RMIT Research Repository?
What objects are included in the repository?
How is the quality of the documents in the RMIT Research Repository assured?
Where else can I search for repository records and full-text?
Are the documents in the RMIT Research Repository citable?

Content Inclusion Guidelines

How far back does the repository go?
Does the repository only include outputs produced while an author was affiliated with RMIT when the work was produced?
What won't be included in the repository?

Contribute

Who can contribute content?
What are the steps for adding records and associated full-text to the RMIT Research Repository?
Why should I contribute my full-text to the RMIT Research Repository?
What are the 3 main versions of my work?
What version of my work can be deposited?

Search and Browse

How can I search?
How do I find my research publications?
Can I search for people by first AND last name?
Can I change the way the results display?
Which browse options are offered?

Statistics

How does RMIT Research Repository calculate statistics?
Can I get figures on how often my papers are being downloaded?
Where are my download statistics?

Copyright

Is the copyright of the publication hosted in the RMIT Research Repository transferred to RMIT?
Will my publisher allow me to upload my full-text to the RMIT Research Repository?

RSS Feeds

What are RSS feeds?
How do I access RSS feeds?
How do I add the Repository news to Internet Explorer's Favorites Center?
How do I add the Repository news to my RSS feed reader?
Can I create an RSS feed that contains a list of my research publications?
How do I subscribe to custom search results (e.g. my Repository contributions) using Internet Explorer?
How do I subscribe to custom search results (e.g. my Repository contributions) using my RSS feed reader?

What is the RMIT Research Repository?
An open access institutional repository, the RMIT Research Repository provides free, searchable access to research publications produced by RMIT University affiliated authors. Its aim is to increase the exposure and impact of RMIT University authored research outputs by centralising them and enabling their worldwide availability.

The RMIT Research Repository is managed by RMIT University Library.
What document types are included in the RMIT Research Repository?
The repository includes records for Books, Book chapters, refereed Journal Articles and refereed Conference Papers. These collections were originally established in line with those identified with the Higher Education Research Data Collection Collection (HERDC). Collections for Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) verified Creative Works and Commissioned Reports were created in 2011 and 2012 respectively.
Masters by Research, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) and Professional Doctorate theses are also included and these date from approx 2006. Those under embargo have been excluded from the repository until expiry.
How are Book, Book Chapter, Conference Paper, Commissioned Report and Journal Article records created in the RMIT Research Repository?
The RMIT Research Repository sources its records from those reported and verified for Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) .

When RMIT University affiliated authors report publications for ERA, Research Office staff create records for them in the Research Master database. Research Office staff then verify them against ERA criteria and when passed (and fully published), they are tagged for inclusion in the RMIT Research Repository. Once a week, repository staff (based in the RMIT University Library) run a software program to target the tagged records and create records for them in the repository.

Please report your publications for inclusion in the ERA scheme at this link: https://roc.research.rmit.edu.au You will need to login to access this page.

For more information regarding the ERA publication reporting process, please see http://www1.rmit.edu.au/staff/research/publish

RMIT University affiliated authors can track the progress of their reported publications via the MyResearch@RMIT service. The MyResearch@RMIT service allows authors to see which publications they have reported, which are pending and those that did not meet ERA criteria.
What objects are included in the repository?
Ideally, records should have full-text objects attached in order to make the content as broadly available as possible. This full-text object should be either the PDF produced by the publisher or other official version, the accepted manuscript or the version originally submitted for publication. Working within the guidelines established by publishers, the version of the object that will be included should be sought in the following order of priority:

1. Published version
2. Accepted manuscript, post peer-review (also referred to as 'post-print')
3. Submitted manuscript, pre peer review, but after acceptance (also referred to as 'pre-print')

NB: Most publishers permit the accepted manuscript to be hosted, so this version would comprise most of the content.

For Creative works, images, videos and sound files are anticipated to be the most commonly included objects.

For theses, the Appropriate Durable Record has been uploaded .
How is the quality of the documents in the RMIT Research Repository assured?
The RMIT Research Repository consists of:

1. Published and peer-reviewed research articles and conference papers
2. Commercially published books and book chapters
3. Verified creative works and commissioned reports.
4. Masters, PhD and Professional Doctorate theses.

All of these publication types have been peer-reviewed and/or commercially published as per Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) or thesis assessment guidelines, thus all have significant scholarly value.
Where else can I search for repository records and full-text?
The records and full-text objects in the RMIT Research Repository are indexed by internet search engines such as Google, Google Scholar, Trove and WorldCat. RMIT Research Repository contents are also searchable via RMIT University Library's LibrarySearch service.
Are the documents in the RMIT Research Repository citable?
Documents in the RMIT Research Repository are equivalent or equal to the conventionally published document, and are therefore citable. Please use the citation shown at the top of the document record.
How far back does the repository go?
Based on the 2010 Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) reporting period, records from 2003 onwards have been the primary target for inclusion in the repository with the long term goal of adding older publications when possible.
Does the repository only include outputs produced while an author was affiliated with RMIT when the work was produced?
For Excellence in Research Australia (ERA), all research outputs of an author affiliated with RMIT at the ERA census date, even if produced elsewhere, are to be reported. These past outputs do not necessarily need to be included in the repository, but doing so allows researchers the benefit of a complete publication profile in the repository. Therefore, research outputs produced prior to an author joining RMIT will be included in the repository if requested by the author, provided that the author was a staff member affiliated with RMIT on the ERA reference date.
What won't be included in the repository?
The following publications are not included:
1. Working and technical papers
2. Raw research data
3. Learning objects
4. Software, images, etc. that are not otherwise classified as research output.
Inclusion of items in the repository is at the discretion of the Research Committee.
Who can contribute content?
All current RMIT University staff members and active researchers are encouraged to contribute the full-text of their research outputs. Higher Degree by Research candidates who have published with an RMIT University affiliation are also encouraged to supply full-text to the repository.
Please send full-text to repository@rmit.edu.au.
What are the steps for adding records and associated full-text to the RMIT Research Repository?
Step 1. Report all of your research outputs for Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) to the Research and Innovation unit. This will ensure that a record for your research outputs will appear in the repository. Report your publications at this link: http://www.rmit.edu.au/staff/research/publish. This step is entirely managed by Research Office staff.

Step 2. After reporting your research outputs for ERA inclusion, send a copy of the full-text version of your output to repository@rmit.edu.au. Most publishers permit the 'accepted manuscript' version and this is the author-created version that incorporates referee comments which has been accepted for publication. The accepted manuscript is not the published version. While it has been refereed and edited, it won't have any publisher logos or other formatting done to it.

Please note: RMIT Research Repository staff are required to adhere to the policies individual publishers have set down regarding what versions can be legally placed in the repository. We are thus the ones responsible for checking these policies. It is not expected that researchers will do this step themselves. The only requirement for researchers is that they provide the publisher's permitted version, and repository staff will help you with this.

Step 3. Wait for repository staff to respond. We will send you a link to the author Deposit Agreement (if you have not already signed one) and will assess the full-text you have sent to confirm its compliance with publisher policy or copyright. Once the publisher permitted version and the signed Author Deposit agreement have been received by the repository, staff can then upload the full-text to its repository record. Repository staff will then send a link to the researcher for viewing.
Why should I contribute my full-text to the RMIT Research Repository?
Placing your content in the repository maximises the visibility and accessibility of your research, hence its usage and impact. Many researchers whose content is hosted in repositories report increased citation rates for their papers, and also increased contact or requests for collaboration from researchers elsewhere who work in similar fields.

Even if your research papers have been published in online journals, many academics and researchers, particularly those from poorer institutions or from developing countries, will still not be able to access them due to barriers such as subscription costs and licensing agreements. This means your research may not reach many people who might otherwise be interested in using and citing it. Its presence in an open acess institutional repository such as the RMIT Research Repository, guarantees your work can be accessed by anyone, which maximises the impact of your work within the global academic community.

Sometimes, library subscriptions to journals lapse. When this happens, there is no guarantee that RMIT researchers will still have access to the materials covered by earlier subscriptions. Placing your full-text in the RMIT Research Repository will mean that a ceased subscription will not affect your readers' opportunity to view your works. Also, as those sites reorganise, URLs may change. The RMIT Research Repository can guarantee you long-term access and secure storage with permanent URLs for any work deposited.
What are the 3 main versions of my work?
When publishing your journal articles, books, conference papers etc., there are several editing and peer-review stages your publication will go through. By formal publication, 3 main versions of your publication will exist. These versions are outlined below:


1. Submitted version - The author's original version that was first submitted for to a publisher for publication.

​2​. ​Accepted ​manuscript - ​Also known as the post-print or author final draft, this version is ​author-created​, ​​incorporates referee comments and is the version accepted ​for publication.​ Accepted manuscripts typically do not have any publisher logos, publisher branding, page numbers, incorporate any publisher copy editing and copyright dates/statements.

​3. Published Version: This version has been created and disseminated by a formal publisher. It will include ​volume and issue numbers, page numbers, branding, and will have been copy edited and peer-reviewed.
What version of my work can be deposited?
What version, if any, you are permitted to deposit will vary from publisher to publisher. Publishers generally do not allow authors to deposit publisher-formatted PDFs in repositories although a small number do. Most major publishers, such as Elsevier and Springer-Verlag, allow authors to deposit the final accepted and refereed version of the manuscript, provided we credit the publisher and link to the online version where possible. Others only permit us to host the pre-refereed version. It is our policy to comply with these publisher deposit conditions and any required acknowledgements.
How can I search?
There are two ways that you can search:
1. Simple search (on the home page): Any terms entered here will search across these fields: title, abstract and keywords
2. Advanced search (available via the Search tab): use this form to restrict a search to one or more of the specific fields shown, such as author, title, publisher, etc.

The Boolean operators 'AND' and 'OR' can be activated using the dropdown menu at the bottom of the form.

In addition, there are several operators available:
1. Phrase: use double quote marks to search for a phrase e.g. "Murray cod"
2. Truncation: use an asterisk to find variants on a word stem e.g. nitr* will find nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite, etc.
3. Wildcards for character substitution: use an asterisk to find terms with any number of characters between letters, e.g. f*ly will find family, fully, firstly, etc. Use a question mark to substitute only one character between letters, e.g. b?ts will find bits, bats, byts, etc.

Note that you cannot use a wildcard symbol as the first character of a search.
How do I find my research publications?
Select the Browse tab, and use the 'All RMIT Authors' option. Alternatively, select the Search tab and enter your surname and first initial separated by a comma, in the Author field. When the list of results appears, click on your name in one of the records. This will bring up all records in the repository for which you are listed as an author.
Can I search for people by first AND last name?
Searching for authors can be done by using surname and first initial, click on their name to bring up all records in which they are listed as an author.

Example: Mitchell, A
Can I change the way the results display?
You can sort the result lists by title, publication date (year) and by the number of views or file downloads. All methods of sorting can also be listed in ascending or descending order. You can also export the results as an Excel file, in XML or as an RSS feed.
Which browse options are offered?
There are three options for browsing:
1. All RMIT Authors: a list arranged alphabetically by surname and first name allowing you to browse all the authors featured in the repository.
2. Publication type: choose the type of publication you are after and browse the complete list of records that fall within this type.
3. Subject: records are classified using the Field of Research hierarchy from the Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification system. You can navigate the classification system using the hyperlinks offered as you browse through the hierarchy.
How does RMIT Research Repository calculate statistics?
The download statistics for the repository are designed to quantify interest in the material within the repository. Generally, each click on a record counts as an abstract view and each click on a full-text PDF, image, video etc is counted as a file download. Statistics are calculated and updated hourly.

Abstract views and full-text downloads are counted separately with tallies for each shown on each record. Where a record shows counts for abstract views only, this is generally because the record does not have a full-text file attached. Specific types of access are not included in the statistics but they are collected in logs. Logs record all activity to do with records, but are excluded from final counts. There are two main exclusions from counts:

1. Activity by search engine crawlers, e.g. the Googlebot for Google, and crawlers from other services such as Yahoo!, ninemsn, etc.
2. Any double clicks emanating from the same person on the same record within the same timeframe for either an abstract view or a full download. The exclusion of double clicks is designed to keep statistics as meaningful as possible.

Other exclusions from counts include 'Bad Requests', '404 File Not Found' errors, and clicks by people who do not have sufficient rights to view the object in question. Since such clicks would not be successful, they are discounted.
Can I get figures on how often my papers are being downloaded?
Downloads per item are listed in the view of each individual item or when items are returned in search results. Links to statistics on the Top 50 papers and the Top 50 authors are available from individual records. Updated nightly, these figures are divided into full-text downloads and abstract views.
Where are my download statistics?
Download statistics per item are stored with the item. To see all your statistics, search on your surname. Download counts for abstract views and file downloads are stored with each item.
Is the copyright of the publication hosted in the RMIT Research Repository transferred to RMIT?
The copyright stays with the author or publisher, depending on the conditions attached at the time of original publication.
Will my publisher allow me to upload my full-text to the RMIT Research Repository?
1. Journal articles or conference papers:
Most publishers permit either the final accepted manuscript or the originally submitted version of a journal article or conference paper to be hosted. Some permit us to host the published version. It is important that we check the conditions attached to each publication and host the version permitted by the publisher. Information about the conditions attached to publication in individual journals, or with specific publishers, can be found at the SHERPA/RoMEO online directory.
2. Books or book chapters:
Most publishers do not permit any version of the full text of books or book chapters to be hosted in the repository. Exceptions may be made if the author has retained copyright of the work or if permission can be obtained from the copyright holder/s.
What are RSS feeds?
RSS allows you to monitor news about, and additions to, a website. If you subscribe to the Research Repository RSS feed, you won't need to keep checking the Repository page to get the latest information.

RSS feeds, or newsfeeds, allow you to:
• receive news about the repository;
• run a search of your contributions to the Repository; and
• run a custom search of the Repository (i.e. searching for a particular topic or contributor)

All RSS feeds are automatically updated, so you don't have to keep checking the Repository page to get the latest information.
How do I access RSS feeds?
Repository newsfeeds can be read either:

• in the Favorites Center of Internet Explorer, or
• in a dedicated feed reader like Bloglines or My Yahoo!.
How do I add the Repository news to Internet Explorer's Favorites Center?
1. Go to the RMIT Research Repository home page
2. Select the News tab on the 'Daily Snapshot' and select the 'RSS' link at the bottom of the list.
3. The RMIT Research Repository News page will open. In the headline select the 'Subscribe to this feed' link.
4. A dialog box will open. Press 'Subscribe' to save the feed in the Favorites Center.
5. Once you have saved the feed, open the Favorites Center, you will see the 'RMIT Research Repository News' feed.
How do I add the Repository news to my RSS feed reader?
1. Go to the RMIT Research Repository home page
2. Select the News tab on the 'Daily Snapshot' and select the 'RSS' link at the bottom of the list.
3. The RMIT Research Repository News page will open. In the headline, right-click on the link 'Subscribe to this feed' and select 'Copy shortcut'.
4. Alt+Tab to your feed reader and paste in the feed URL.
5. Save the feed in the appropriate folder.
Can I create an RSS feed that contains a list of my research publications?
Yes, you can create an RSS feed of your publications that are part of the Repository. Follow the 'How do I subscribe to custom search results' instructions below. This can be used to populate your personal webpage or your profile in social networking services such as Facebook, using an RSS application.
How do I subscribe to custom search results (e.g. my Repository contributions) using Internet Explorer?
1. Perform a Browse or Search by Author Name.
2. Select 'Subscribe to the RSS feed for this search result' link located in the Browse Results bar.
3. A new page will open. In the headline select the 'Subscribe to this feed' link.
4. A dialog box will open. Edit the search name if you like and press 'Subscribe' to save the feed in the Favorites Center.
5. Once you have saved the feed, open the Favorites Center, you will see your feed.
How do I subscribe to custom search results (e.g. my Repository contributions) using my RSS feed reader?
1. Perform a Browse or Search by Author Name.
2. Right-click on the 'Subscribe to the RSS feed for this search result' link located in the Browse Results bar, and select 'Copy shortcut' option.
3. Alt+Tab to your feed reader and paste in the feed URL.
4. Save the feed in the appropriate folder.
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