Representations of death in the poetry of Stevie Smith

Mokhtari, T 2010, Representations of death in the poetry of Stevie Smith, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Media and Communications, RMIT University.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: Theses

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size
Mokhtari.pdf Thesis application/pdf 1.14MB
Title Representations of death in the poetry of Stevie Smith
Author(s) Mokhtari, T
Year 2010
Abstract
The English poet, Stevie Smith, is best known for poetry which offers childlike poetic voices and accompanying drawings, traits which resulted in her often being overlooked as a serious twentieth century poet. But what lies beneath Smith’s strange poetic veneer that continue to engage her readers? In this thesis, which comprises an exegesis on Smith and an original creative verse novel, Mokhtari examines how death dominates Smith’s poems on human suffering, gender and sexuality, culture and politics. She argues that Smith offers a kind of Nietzschean solution to the horrors of existence – the drive toward death and the exploration of that drive through art. The death theme of her poems that was deemed so precarious by Smith’s friends and colleagues seemed to allow Smith to embrace her marginality and avoid the despair of poets such as Plath and Sexton. Smith didn’t see her obsession to its awful, fatal conclusion, escaping it through imaginary constructs for her readers rather than at her own hand. In analysing and engaging with Smith’s work and responding to it through her own creative practice, Mokhtari offers new insights into this odd, paradoxical poet, her obsession and her work.
Degree Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Media and Communications
Keyword(s) Stevie Smith
poetry
verse novels
death
feminism
modernity
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 353 Abstract Views, 4592 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 08 Apr 2011, 16:25:48 EST by Guy Aron
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us