Idiosyncratic volatility and security returns: evidence from Germany and United Kingdom

Drew, M, Malin, M, Naughton, A and Veeraraghavan, M 2006, 'Idiosyncratic volatility and security returns: evidence from Germany and United Kingdom', Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 80-93.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Idiosyncratic volatility and security returns: evidence from Germany and United Kingdom
Author(s) Drew, M
Malin, M
Naughton, A
Veeraraghavan, M
Year 2006
Journal name Studies in Economics and Finance
Volume number 23
Issue number 2
Start page 80
End page 93
Total pages 13
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Abstract PURPOSE - Malkiel and Xu state that idiosyncratic volatility is highly correlated with size and that it plays a powerful role in explaining expected returns. The purpose of this paper is to ask whether idiosyncratic volatility is useful in explaining the variation in expected returns; and whether the findings can be explained by the turn of the year effect. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY - Monthly stock returns and market values of all listed firms in Germany and UK covering the period 1991-2001 from Datastream are used as the basis of the evaluation. FINDINGS - The paper finds that the three-factor model provides a better description of expected returns than the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). That is, it is found that firm size and idiosyncratic volatility are related to security returns. In addition, it is noted that the findings are robust throughout the sample period. ORIGINALITY/VALUE - The paper shows that the CAPM beta alone is not sufficient to explain the variation in stock returns.
Subject Finance
DOI - identifier 10.1108/10867370610683897
Copyright notice © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN 1086-7376
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