Achieving target skills in increments using PBL courses in chemical engineering program at RMIT University

Parthasarathy, R and Jollands, M 2009, 'Achieving target skills in increments using PBL courses in chemical engineering program at RMIT University', in Dr. Colin Kestall, Dr. Steven Grainger, Prof. John Cheung (ed.) Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference for the Australasian Association for Engineering Education, Adelaide, Australia, 6 - 9 Dec 2009, pp. 99-104.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

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Title Achieving target skills in increments using PBL courses in chemical engineering program at RMIT University
Author(s) Parthasarathy, R
Jollands, M
Year 2009
Conference name 20th Annual Conference for the Australasian Association for Engineering Education
Conference location Adelaide, Australia
Conference dates 6 - 9 Dec 2009
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference for the Australasian Association for Engineering Education
Editor(s) Dr. Colin Kestall, Dr. Steven Grainger, Prof. John Cheung
Publisher The School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide
Place of publication Adelaide, Australia
Start page 99
End page 104
Total pages 6
Abstract Graduating Chemical Engineering students are expected to have acquired a number of technical and generic skills that include design, project management, communication and team work. In the new Chemical Engineering program at RMIT University, students are offered opportunities to develop these skills in stages through project-based learning (PBL) courses. Each semester has a PBL course which integrates horizontally the scientific and engineering concepts taught in other courses in that semester. The PBL courses in senior years, however, aim to achieve not only the horizontal integration of concepts from that semester but also vertical integration of concepts taught in previous years. In all PBL courses (eight in total), the development of generic skills is given equal opportunity. However the development of design skills are achieved in stages and it occurs mainly in six of the PBL courses. This incremental progression of design skill development prepares the students to face the final year capstone design project with confidence and excitement. The high satisfaction level in the design project as indicated by a high good teaching score (GTS) of 82% in 2008 shows that the progressive development of technical and generic skills using PBL courses is an effective means of preparing work-ready graduates.
Subjects Science, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy
Copyright notice © Raj Parthasarathy & Margaret Jollands, 2009
ISBN 1876346590
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