The effect of a high-protein, low glycemic-load diet versus a conventional, high glycemic-load diet on biochemical parameters associated with acne vulgaris: A randomized, investigator-masked, controlled trial

Smith, R, Mann, N, Braue, A, Makelainen, H and Varigos, G 2007, 'The effect of a high-protein, low glycemic-load diet versus a conventional, high glycemic-load diet on biochemical parameters associated with acne vulgaris: A randomized, investigator-masked, controlled trial', Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 247-256.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title The effect of a high-protein, low glycemic-load diet versus a conventional, high glycemic-load diet on biochemical parameters associated with acne vulgaris: A randomized, investigator-masked, controlled trial
Author(s) Smith, R
Mann, N
Braue, A
Makelainen, H
Varigos, G
Year 2007
Journal name Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume number 57
Issue number 2
Start page 247
End page 256
Total pages 9
Publisher Mosby
Abstract BACKGROUND - No previous study has sought to examine the influence of dietary composition on acne vulgaris. OBJECTIVE - We sought to compare the effect of an experimental low glycemic-load diet with a conventional high glycemic-load diet on clinical and endocrine aspects of acne vulgaris. METHODS - A total of 43 male patients with acne completed a 12-week, parallel, dietary intervention study with investigator-masked dermatology assessments. Primary outcomes measures were changes in lesion counts, sex hormone binding globulin, free androgen index, insulin-like growth factor-I, and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. RESULTS - At 12 weeks, total lesion Counts had decreased more in the experimental group (-21.9 [95% confidence interval -26.8 to -19.0]) compared with the control group (-13.8 [-19.1 to -8-5], P = .01). The experimental diet also reduced weight (P = .001), reduced the free androgen index (P = .04), and increased, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (P = .001) when compared with a high glycemic-load diet. LIMITATIONS - We Could not preclude the role of weight loss in the overall treatment effect. CONCLUSION - This suggests nutrition-related lifestyle factors play a role in acne pathogenesis. However, these preliminary findings should be confirmed by similar studies.
Subject Dermatology
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.jaad.2007.01.046
Copyright notice Copyright © 2007 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc.
ISSN 0190-9622
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