Generic skills: Do capstone courses deliver?

Keller, S, Chan, C and Parker, C 2010, 'Generic skills: Do capstone courses deliver?', in Professor Marcia Devlin (ed.) Proceedings of the HERDSA 2010 International Conference, Reshaping Higher Education, Melbourne, Australia, 6-9 July 2010, pp. 383-393.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Generic skills: Do capstone courses deliver?
Author(s) Keller, S
Chan, C
Parker, C
Year 2010
Conference name HERDSA 2010 International Conference, Reshaping Higher Education
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 6-9 July 2010
Proceedings title Proceedings of the HERDSA 2010 International Conference, Reshaping Higher Education
Editor(s) Professor Marcia Devlin
Publisher Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia
Place of publication Milperra, NSW, Australia
Start page 383
End page 393
Total pages 11
Abstract Generic skills are increasingly the focus of universities worldwide and are often developed in professional practice courses. This paper presents qualitative findings from students regarding their perceptions of the generic skills they developed during a capstone course in an Information Systems program. The study found that the capstone course improved their collaborative team-work, presentation skills and ability to apply skills/knowledge to new situations. The paper also demonstrates that students' perceptions of generic skills were more closely tied to the discipline than university-wide generic skills. This lends support for generic skills policy/practice to be driven bottom-up rather than top-down.
Subjects Information Systems not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Generic skills
Capstone course
Student perceptions
Copyright notice Copyright © 2010 HERDSA and the authors
ISBN 0908557809
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