Social Media Data Mining: A Social Network Analysis of Tweets During the Australian 2010-2011 Floods

Cheong, F and Cheong, C 2011, 'Social Media Data Mining: A Social Network Analysis of Tweets During the Australian 2010-2011 Floods', in Peter B. Seddon and Shirley Gregor. (ed.) PACIS 2011 - 15th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems: Quality Research in Pacific, Brisbane, Australia, 7-11 Jul 2011, pp. 1-16.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Social Media Data Mining: A Social Network Analysis of Tweets During the Australian 2010-2011 Floods
Author(s) Cheong, F
Cheong, C
Year 2011
Conference name 15th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (PACIS)
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 7-11 Jul 2011
Proceedings title PACIS 2011 - 15th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems: Quality Research in Pacific
Editor(s) Peter B. Seddon and Shirley Gregor.
Publisher Queensland University of Technology
Place of publication Brisbane, Australia
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Abstract Using tweets extracted from Twitter during the Australian 2010-2011 floods, social network analysis techniques were used to generate and analyse the online networks that emerged at that time. The aim was to develop an understanding of the online communities for the Queensland, New South Wales and Victorian floods in order to identify active players and their effectiveness in disseminating critical information. A secondary goal was to identify important online resources disseminated by these communities. Important and effective players during the Queensland floods were found to be: local authorities (mainly the Queensland Police Services), political personalities (Queensland Premier, Prime Minister, Opposition Leader, Member of Parliament), social media volunteers, traditional media reporters, and people from not-for-profit, humanitarian, and community associations. A range of important resources were identified during the Queensland flood; however, they appeared to be of a more general information nature rather than vital information and updates on the disaster. Unlike Queensland, there was no evidence of Twitter activity from the part of local authorities and the government in the New South Wales and Victorian floods. Furthermore, the level of Twitter activity during the NSW floods was almost nil. Most of the active players during the NSW and Victorian floods were volunteers who were active during the Queensland floods. Given the positive results obtained by the active involvement of the local authorities and government officials in Queensland, and the increasing adoption of Twitter in other parts of the world for emergency situations, it seems reasonable to push for greater adoption of Twitter from local and federal authorities Australia-wide during periods of mass emergencies.
Subjects Mobile Technologies
Keyword(s) Social network analysis
Text mining
Social media
Mass emergencies
ISBN 9781864356441
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