Affordable rental housing: Lost, stolen and strayed

Wood, G and Yates, J 2005, 'Affordable rental housing: Lost, stolen and strayed', in J. Sheen and D. Wright (ed.) The Economic Record: Selected papers from the 33rd Australian Conference of Economists, Sydney Sept 27-30, 2004. Special Issue Volume 81 August 2005, Sydney, Australia, 15 August 2005.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Affordable rental housing: Lost, stolen and strayed
Author(s) Wood, G
Yates, J
Year 2005
Conference name 33rd Australian Conference of Economists
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 15 August 2005
Proceedings title The Economic Record: Selected papers from the 33rd Australian Conference of Economists, Sydney Sept 27-30, 2004. Special Issue Volume 81 August 2005
Editor(s) J. Sheen
D. Wright
Publisher Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of publication Australia
Abstract This paper contributes to an exploration of the potential causes (as distinct from existence) of social and spatial polarisation. It focuses on the changing provision of low-rent housing in a spatial context, and hence on the role that the private rental market plays in the residential choices available to lower income households. The paper applies multinomial logit estimation to panel data to determine the factors that affect the probability that an existing rental dwelling remains at the same real rent value over the decade from 1991 to 2001, filters down or up or exits from the private rental market. It tests the hypothesis that the outcome is affected by neighbourhood characteristics.
Subjects Urban and Regional Economics
Keyword(s) social and spacial polarisation
low-rent housing
DOI - identifier 10.1111/j.1475-4932.2005.00253.x
Copyright notice © 2005. The Economic Society of Australia.
Versions
Version Filter Type
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 273 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 08 Apr 2009, 09:42:32 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us