Critical success factors for knowledge transfer via Australian and Malaysian government education websites: a comparative case study

Azizan, N 2011, Critical success factors for knowledge transfer via Australian and Malaysian government education websites: a comparative case study, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Business Information Technology and Logistics, RMIT University.


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Collection: Theses

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Title Critical success factors for knowledge transfer via Australian and Malaysian government education websites: a comparative case study
Author(s) Azizan, N
Year 2011
Abstract The transfer of knowledge pertaining to government is central to the success of e-government websites. The purpose of this research is to investigate how Australian and Malaysian government website providers perceive the critical success factors (CSFs) for the transfer of knowledge from government to users (citizens, business entities, employees and other government agencies) via Australian and Malaysian government education websites. CSFs are defined as “the limited number of areas in which results, if satisfactory, will ensure successful competitive performance for the organization” (Rockart 1979, p. 5). It has been recognised that there are generally a small number of such attributes that, if performed well, will create opportunities for success (King 2001).  Knowledge transfer (KT) is defined as a process that includes “any exchange of knowledge between or among individuals, teams, groups or organizations” (King 2006, p. 538). It is the process by which knowledge is transmitted to, and absorbed by, users. Knowledge in this research is scoped to include government knowledge resources (information and services) made explicit and available to users via government websites. A failure by organisations to appreciate and facilitate KT via this means can adversely affect the time spent by those seeking knowledge, increase the costs associated with KT errors, and result in an inadequate flow of essential knowledge to recipients. The research applies content analysis techniques to analyse qualitative data that were collected using interview and focus group techniques. Szulanski’s KT model was adapted as a lens to study CSFs. The model consists of four stages: initiation; implementation; ramp-up; and integration. Based upon analysis of interviews and focus groups, 11 and 14 CSFs were identified by respondents from Australia and Malaysia, respectively.  Points of similarity and difference were highlighted and discussed. The CSFs identified at each organisation were grouped into six themes: management role, user focus, employee focus, content focus, technology focus and organisational culture. The relevance of CSFs to each of the four KT stages (initiation, implementation, ramp-up and integration) was also mapped. The research provides guidance to practitioners, arguing that identifying and understanding the CSFs can support government website providers when taking decisions related to the direction of their website’s content development and delivery activities, thus enhancing their capacity to deliver requisite knowledge to website users.
Degree Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Business Information Technology and Logistics
Keyword(s) E-government
Australia
Malaysia
Critical success factors
Knowledge transfer
Education
Government website
Case study
Comparative study
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Created: Wed, 12 Sep 2012, 14:43:06 EST by Brett Fenton
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