Risk management for the implementation of energy efficient and renewable technologies in Australian green office buildings

Mosly, I 2012, Risk management for the implementation of energy efficient and renewable technologies in Australian green office buildings, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, RMIT University.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: Theses

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size
Mosly.pdf Thesis Click to show the corresponding preview/stream application/pdf;... 3.75MB
Title Risk management for the implementation of energy efficient and renewable technologies in Australian green office buildings
Author(s) Mosly, I
Year 2012
Abstract Green buildings are becoming popular these days, mainly due to the increasing governmental and public awareness of the need to reduce the impacts of global warming caused by the production of greenhouse gas emissions and the consumption of natural resources. Paradoxically, green buildings are not becoming as common as researchers/governments had hoped. Certain types of technologies, such as energy efficient and renewable technologies (EERTs), are used in green buildings in order to help them become more environmentally-friendly. This research focuses on four main categories of energy related technologies, including two energy efficient categories which are related to heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems, and two renewable energy categories which are related to solar and wind resources. A total of nine technologies are selected for study within these four categories. Under the HVAC category there are four technologies: radiant systems, chilled beams, underfloor air distribution systems, and night purge and natural ventilation. Under the lighting category there are two technologies: energy efficient light bulbs and motion sensors. Under the solar category there are two technologies: photovoltaic panels and thermal heating systems. The single technology under the wind category is wind turbines.

Unfortunately, these technologies are relatively new and may present many risks during their implementation lifecycle for different project stakeholders. This research focuses on identifying and managing the critical risks influencing the application of EERTs in Australian green office buildings. The data collection methods consist of questionnaires, interviews and case studies. The questionnaires resulted in the identification of 14 critical risks for EERTs implemented in Australian green office buildings. They also revealed that the owners of these technologies are the most affected by the risks of EERTs and the operational stage of the lifecycle is the most likely phase of occurrence for these risks. The interviews resulted in the identification of 36 different measures to manage the 14 critical risks of EERTs. Furthermore, the research identifies the persons to manage these critical risks and the lifecycle stages at which to take action against these critical risks. The research results also disclose 37 causes and 18 impacts of these critical risks. The main purpose of the case studies is to validate the framework on two six star certified Australian green office buildings and improve the framework by practical experience. The final outcome of this research is the creation of a framework for the critical risk management of the implementation of EERTs in Australian green office buildings. This research will provide guidance to and enable informed decisions by industry practitioners and stakeholders in implementing EERTs in Australian green office buildings. This research is the first of its kind and lays the foundations for future related research.
Degree Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering
Keyword(s) Risk management
Lifecycle
Stakeholders
Energy efficient technologies
Renewable energy technologies
Green office buildings
Australia
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 397 Abstract Views, 796 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 24 Sep 2012, 10:48:17 EST by Brett Fenton
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us