Accessibility to green space in the Melbourne metropolitan area.

Hao, Z 2013, Accessibility to green space in the Melbourne metropolitan area., Masters by Research, Mathematical and Geospatial Sciences, RMIT University.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: Theses

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Hao.pdf Thesis application/pdf 30.41MB
Title Accessibility to green space in the Melbourne metropolitan area.
Author(s) Hao, Z
Year 2013
Abstract Demand for green space by the public is becoming stronger for aesthetic enjoyment, recreation, clean air and quiet environment. Green space can protect biodiversity, absorb pollutants, adjust urban temperature and increase urban residents’ longevity. Accessibility to green spaces has been regarded as a useful measure of the quality of life in urban areas. Adequate and equitable accessibility to green space for all residents in urban areas is an important planning objective in many urban areas in the world, including the Melbourne Metropolitan Area (MMA), to sustain urban residents’ quality of life and well-being. The relative contributions of different kinds of facilities to the attractiveness of a green space have been weighted in relation to four population groups, determined from the 2011 ABS census data, including young (aged 0-15), adult (aged 16-64), aged (aged 65+), and total (aged 0-115). The accessibility values to neighbourhood green spaces for the four groups of population from each Mesh block (MB) across the MMA are measured with the following four different methods: M2SFCA_G, the 2-step floating catchment area modified by the Gaussion function; M2SFCA_B, the 2-step floating catchment area modified by the Butterworth filter; M3SFCA_G, the 3-step floating catchment area modified by the Gaussion function; and M3SFCA_B, the 3-step floating catchment area modified by the Butterworth filter.. According to MB level accessibility measured with the modified floating catchment area method, on average, the percentage of population with relatively high, Medium +, Medium, Medium -, and low accessibility to green space is about 21.2%, 18.5%, 25.6%, 18.7%, and 16.2%, These findings should provide valuable evidence for urban planners and public policy makers as well as the general public for formulating future urban plans. The methodology developed in this study should be applicable to other metropolitan areas within and even beyond Australia, should the required datasets are readily available and accessible. The thesis also includes some discussions about the relative merits of the four different floating catchment area based methods and some recommendations for future researches.
Degree Masters by Research
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Mathematical and Geospatial Sciences
Keyword(s) accessibility
green space
Melbourne
floating catchment area
geographical information system
mesh block
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Created: Fri, 04 Jul 2014, 15:44:13 EST by Lynne Johns
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