The nature of things: reinterpreting the still life genre in the twenty first century

Cleary, S 2014, The nature of things: reinterpreting the still life genre in the twenty first century, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Art, RMIT University.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: Theses

Title The nature of things: reinterpreting the still life genre in the twenty first century
Author(s) Cleary, S
Year 2014
Abstract The different aspects of ecology, including human ecology and the impact of “man’s ecological footprint” on the natural native environment are the main themes of my doctoral project.
The still life genre creates an ideal premise for this investigation, due to its long history dating back to antiquity, which often used familiar everyday objects to reveal the fundamental social, cultural and political aspects of society in which they are produced. The re-interpretation of traditional still life, and the re-investigation of traditional craft skills and techniques, with the incorporation of mixed-media, forms the premise of my research for this Doctorate.

My research examines current trends in fine art practice, particularly ‘hybrid’ craft practices and mixed media artworks that seek to re-investigate or re-interpret the still life genre in the 21st century. Concurrently I have developed a body of work that specifically explores these cross-disciplinary mechanisms and classifications to reflect on our changing natural environment. These works reference current socio and/or political aspects of contemporary society concerning environmental issues by using symbolic objects and their arrangement, as metaphors for the fragility and vulnerability of our natural ecological systems.
Degree Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Art
Keyword(s) Still life
ecology
contemporary art
mixed media
craft practice
sculpture
instillation art
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Created: Fri, 12 Dec 2014, 16:04:32 EST by Maria Lombardo
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