Investigating the enabling role of Web 2.0 technology for interactive e-learning in Australian and Sri Lankan higher education

Thanthri Waththage, K 2015, Investigating the enabling role of Web 2.0 technology for interactive e-learning in Australian and Sri Lankan higher education, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Business Information Technology and Logistics, RMIT University.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: Theses

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size
Thanthri_Waththage.pdf Thesis Click to show the corresponding preview/stream application/pdf;... 1.18MB
Title Investigating the enabling role of Web 2.0 technology for interactive e-learning in Australian and Sri Lankan higher education
Author(s) Thanthri Waththage, K
Year 2015
Abstract Interactions are at the heart of e-learning as they enable learners to actively develop knowledge, acquire skills and develop the sense of belonging and satisfaction. Much attention is paid on developing interactive e-learning systems for facilitating active interactions between learners and learning resources, instructors and peer learners.

Numerous technologies such as simulation technology and Web 2.0 technology are used to facilitate interactive e-learning to date. Those technologies support learners to interact with learning resources, instructors and peer learners to different extents. To facilitate interactive e-learning, it is important for educators and e-learning developers to understand how well technologies as above support interactions in e-learning.

Web 2.0 technology has become popular around the world recently due to their ease of use, portability and high availability. Much research has been done on how Web 2.0 technology could be used for interactive e-learning. Existing research, however, has several limitations. For example, a majority of research has investigated how a specific Web 2.0 tool supports a specific kind of interactions in e-learning such as learner-learner interaction. Furthermore, much of existing research on Web 2.0 based interactive e-learning is conducted in developed countries. Whether Web 2.0 technology supports interactive e-learning in developing countries in a similar manner to developed countries, or whether developing countries could learn lessons from developed countries on using Web 2.0 technology for interactive e-learning are, therefore, not clear.

This research aims to investigate the enabling role of Web 2.0 technology for interactive e-learning in higher education in Australia, a developed country and Sri Lanka, a developing country. To meet this aim, a quantitative research approach is adopted. Following this research approach, a conceptual framework on Web 2.0 based interactive e-learning developed based on a comprehensive review of the relevant literature, is validated using the survey data collected from learners in universities in Australia and Sri Lanka.

The validation of the conceptual framework reveals that Web 2.0 technology supports the three major types of interactions in learning, namely, learner-learning resources, learner-instructor and learner-learner interactions in both Australia and Sri Lanka to a great extent. Furthermore, no significant differences are found on how Web 2.0 technology supports interactive e-learning in the above countries. The implication of these findings is that Web 2.0 tools could be used to improve the interactivity of e-learning. Another implication of this research is that new and more interactive e-learning systems can be developed by using Web 2.0 technology, in particular, for the purposes of managing learning resources, managing personal knowledge, delivering instructional support and collaborating in order to improve the effectiveness of e-learning.

From a practical perspective, this study presents an in-depth investigation of how Web 2.0 technology can be used for improving the interactivity of e-learning in Australia and Sri Lanka. It also provides specific guidelines for developing interactive e-learning environments using Web 2.0 technology. From a theoretical perspective, this research finds that Web 2.0 technology could be used in developing countries and developed countries to improve the three major interactions in e-learning.
Degree Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Business Information Technology and Logistics
Subjects Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
Higher Education
Educational Technology and Computing
Keyword(s) E-learning
Structural equation modelling
Interactions
Web 2.0
Cross-cultural
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 442 Abstract Views, 534 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 10 Jul 2015, 09:14:46 EST by Keely Chapman
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us