Post-material making: explorations for a materially connected textile design practice

Lynas, E 2019, Post-material making: explorations for a materially connected textile design practice, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Fashion and Textiles, RMIT University.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: Theses

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Title Post-material making: explorations for a materially connected textile design practice
Author(s) Lynas, E
Year 2019
Abstract The textile design profession currently exists within the textile clothing and footwear (TCF) sector amongst other materials-oriented industries including homewares (textiles and ceramics) and automotive. The core business of commercial textile design practice involves designing, decorative, and/or functional textiles and/or surfaces for the consumer market. The TCF and associated industries currently value the textile designers' design skills and abilities in the creations of visual and haptic material outcomes for the market. This narrow focus fails to recognise the extent of the designers' textile intelligence and the agency of textiles themselves.

Post-material making: explorations for a materially connected textile design practice explores methods of making that shift the emphasis to include a process or service orientated approach, geared towards connecting people, materials and place. This is in recognition that design without consideration of people, materials and place often renders textiles, and associated objects and things, as waste. Central to supporting this shift is the need to recognise, expand and better articulate what constitutes a textile designers' textile intelligence. This research explores the extent of this intelligence via a series of practice-led and action research projects informed by Slow, co-design and post-materialism. The methodology is autoethnographic and positioned within an Australian context.

The findings encourage textile designers to reflect upon the work they do, and have done, and for textile design educators and students to explore post-material making activities as part of the university curriculum. The findings provide an expanded understanding of what the discipline of textile design can contribute to the TCF industry and society more broadly. The research is situated within the broader (global) discussion around methods for sustainable textile design practice.
Degree Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Institution RMIT University
School, Department or Centre Fashion and Textiles
Subjects Textile and Fashion Design
Keyword(s) textiles
design
sustainability
practice-led
connection
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Created: Fri, 15 Nov 2019, 11:32:41 EST by Keely Chapman
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