Dancing with the cows: theorising hot heritage in Newmarket saleyards and abattoirs

Hillier, J 2012, 'Dancing with the cows: theorising hot heritage in Newmarket saleyards and abattoirs', in Andrew Butt and Melissa Kennedy (ed.) The Proceedings of the Australia and New Zealand Association of Planning Schools 2012 Conference, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia, 21-23 September 2012, pp. 60-70.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Dancing with the cows: theorising hot heritage in Newmarket saleyards and abattoirs
Author(s) Hillier, J
Year 2012
Conference name Australia and New Zealand Association of Planning
Conference location La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia
Conference dates 21-23 September 2012
Proceedings title The Proceedings of the Australia and New Zealand Association of Planning Schools 2012 Conference
Editor(s) Andrew Butt and Melissa Kennedy
Publisher Community Planning and Development Program, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia
Place of publication Bendigo, Australia
Start page 60
End page 70
Total pages 11
Abstract Regarding urban regeneration and cultural heritage as continually renegotiated actualisations of assemblages of power, of exclusions and inclusions, I walk fantastically with the cows along the stock-route through what has become Lynch's Bridge and Kensington Banks in Melbourne, Australia, to problematise practices of branding with cultural heritage artefacts and values. The heritage 'preserved' in these schemes represents a highly sanitised, commodified image of the former saleyards and abattoirs which freezes into 'truth' mythical cultural entities. In contrast, Deleuzean thinking inspires an immanent conception of heritage; less traditional artefact and more relational spatial practice of past-present-future which stimulates visitors to think differently. 'Hot heritage' aims to challenge those who encounter heritage to question their values, attitudes and actions, to renegotiate cultural meaning through generative, sensational encounters which create an evental space for thinking otherwise. Cultural heritage, therefore, should not be regarded as a past-presence to be 'preserved', but as a calling-towards potentiality.
Subjects History and Theory of the Built Environment (excl. Architecture)
Keyword(s) Planning theory
Deleuze
hot heritage
Copyright notice © 2012 Community Planning and Development Program, La Trobe University Bendigo Australia and the individual authors
ISBN 9780987342928
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