Culturally sensitive human resource development in the multicultural workplace: 'Western' and 'Confucian heritage' experiences

Hoare, L 2005, 'Culturally sensitive human resource development in the multicultural workplace: 'Western' and 'Confucian heritage' experiences', in Peter L. Jeffery (ed.) Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, Australia, 29- November - 02 December 2004, pp. 1-18.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Culturally sensitive human resource development in the multicultural workplace: 'Western' and 'Confucian heritage' experiences
Author(s) Hoare, L
Year 2005
Conference name Australian Association for Research and Education International Conference
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 29- November - 02 December 2004
Proceedings title Australian Association for Research in Education
Editor(s) Peter L. Jeffery
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Abstract This research investigated the extent to which experiential pedagogies are appropriate for use with multicultural groups by testing an assumption that a dissonance exists between the perception of methodological efficacy assumed by "Western" adult education methods, and the perceptions of learning program participants of "Asian"/Confucian background. Data relating to the research question was collected through a process of interpersonal interviews with adult educators working in Melbourne, Australia and from focus groups involving people of Confucian background who have participated in workplace based development. The responses of the two groups were compared and contrasted. The research found that significant difference of perception exists between the two groups. The research identifies opportunities to render training programs more culturally inclusive through adaptations to program structure, processes, attention to learning styles, the level of interpersonal interactivity and the training environment. The research proposes that we are often unaware that our accepted notions and most ethically based intentions are blinkered by our subconscious cultural socialisation. The implications of these findings are significant for those who have the responsibility to design, implement and coordinate workplace education and training. The research concludes with suggestions for changes in practice and recommendations for future research
Subjects Human Resources Management
Copyright notice © 2005 Australian Association for Research in Education
ISSN 1324-9339
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