Fitness for purpose? Thermal performance modelling of recent Top End remote Indigenous housing in the Northern Territory

Martel, A, Horne, R and Wakefield, R 2012, 'Fitness for purpose? Thermal performance modelling of recent Top End remote Indigenous housing in the Northern Territory', in Andrew Beer (ed.) Proceedings of the 6th Australasian Housing Researchers' Conference (AHRC12), Adelaide, Australia, 8-10 February, 2012, pp. 1-15.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

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Title Fitness for purpose? Thermal performance modelling of recent Top End remote Indigenous housing in the Northern Territory
Author(s) Martel, A
Horne, R
Wakefield, R
Year 2012
Conference name AHRC12
Conference location Adelaide, Australia
Conference dates 8-10 February, 2012
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 6th Australasian Housing Researchers' Conference (AHRC12)
Editor(s) Andrew Beer
Publisher University of Adelaide
Place of publication Adelaide, Australia
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Abstract The principles for good thermal design of houses in hot and humid climates are well known. Heating is largely un-necessary and evaporative cooling methods often ineffective, but strategies such as ensuring good ventilation, adequate shading to walls and windows, and providing ventilated roof spaces with insulated ceilings are commonly employed as passive design elements. Passive design considerations are important when designing housing for remote Indigenous communities in tropical regions, but there are other design priorities that must be accommodated. These priorities include cultural practices and preferences regarding dwelling form, privacy and security, climate suitability, durability, and the logistics of building in remote areas. Common delivery solutions combining pre-fabricated and in-situ building processes are adopted in response to time constraints, labour skill-set availability, and cost factors. This paper examines a case-study of recently constructed house-types in Nguiu (Wurrumiyanga) and Wadeye, in the Northern Territory. Modelled energy performance is assessed, and the effect on overall energy efficiency of design decisions reflecting cultural, material and procurement priorities identified.
Subjects Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
Building Science and Techniques
Keyword(s) thermal performance
housing design
remote communities
Copyright notice © 2012 University of Adelaide
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