Employers of migrants and refugees in regional Australia: profit-minded, ethical, ethnicizing, or all of the above?

Boese, M 2012, 'Employers of migrants and refugees in regional Australia: profit-minded, ethical, ethnicizing, or all of the above?', in Alex Broom, Lynda Cheshire, Ellie Vasta (ed.) Proceedings of the Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference (TASA 2012), Brisbane, Australia, 26 - 29 November 2012, pp. 1-8.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Employers of migrants and refugees in regional Australia: profit-minded, ethical, ethnicizing, or all of the above?
Author(s) Boese, M
Year 2012
Conference name Emerging and Enduring Inequalities
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 26 - 29 November 2012
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference (TASA 2012)
Editor(s) Alex Broom, Lynda Cheshire, Ellie Vasta
Publisher Australian Sociological Association
Place of publication Canberra, Australia
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Abstract Employers play a key role in the current Australian immigration system by shaping the demand for specific skills and the actual immigration of large amounts of overseas migrants. They also influence the internal migration process of humanitarian entrants by facilitating relocation from metropolitan locations to work in regional locations. Beyond paid employment, some employers also provide informal settlement assistance to their recently arrived employees from overseas. This article explores the rationales that underpin these additional roles played by employers of new migrants in some regional locations. Based on recently completed, ARC-funded research on regional settlement in Australia, it highlights the complexity of employers' motivations, which are characterised by business rationales, moral and ethical considerations with some ethnic bias in the mix. Drawing on the perspectives of migrants and employers, the article shows how these seemingly contrasting considerations comfortably co-exist in a regulatory vacuum.
Subjects Industrial Relations
Sociology not elsewhere classified
Migration
Keyword(s) Employers
migrants
refugees
employment
settlement
Copyright notice © Copyright TASA 2013
ISBN 9780646587837
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