Watch your steps: Designing a semi-public display to promote physical activity

Cercos, R and Mueller, F 2013, 'Watch your steps: Designing a semi-public display to promote physical activity', in Stefan Greuter, Christian McCrea, Florian Mueller, Larissa Hjorth, Deborah Richards (ed.) Proceedings of the 9th Australasian Conference on Interactive Entertainment: Matters of Life and Death, Melbourne, Australia, 30 September -1 October 2013, pp. 1-6.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

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Title Watch your steps: Designing a semi-public display to promote physical activity
Author(s) Cercos, R
Mueller, F
Year 2013
Conference name IE '13 Matters of Life and Death
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 30 September -1 October 2013
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 9th Australasian Conference on Interactive Entertainment: Matters of Life and Death
Editor(s) Stefan Greuter, Christian McCrea, Florian Mueller, Larissa Hjorth, Deborah Richards
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Place of publication New York, United States
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Abstract Sedentary time is considered a health risk factor, even when it is compensated with some exercise. Frequent activities of minimal physical exertion throughout the day like walking or climbing stairs are therefore recommended. To promote these activities through social play and collective awareness, we designed a semipublic display that shows the step count of a group of players in near real-time, using a wearable self-monitoring device that senses their physical activity. We included a fictional player that walked at constant speed during the whole day to promote a shared goal. Our preliminary findings suggest that the display motivated players to use a self-monitoring device everyday and enabled new conversations among players without producing privacy issues. Emotional connections with non-collocated participants and creative ways of cheating were also observed. We believe our work highlights the opportunities to extend the potential of selfmonitoring devices, which require little effort and resources to be implemented.
Subjects Computer-Human Interaction
Computer Gaming and Animation
Ubiquitous Computing
Keyword(s) Persuasive technology
persuasive games
serious games
behavior change
behavior change technologies
self-monitoring devices
physical activity displays
DOI - identifier 10.1145/2513002.2513016
Copyright notice © 2013 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc
ISBN 9781450322546
Additional Notes This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in Proceedings of the 9th Australasian Conference on Interactive Entertainment: Matters of Life and Death, http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2513002.2513016
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