'Going green'?: The limitations of behaviour change programmes as a policy response to escalating resource consumption

Moloney, S and Strengers, Y 2014, ''Going green'?: The limitations of behaviour change programmes as a policy response to escalating resource consumption', Environmental Policy and Governance, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 94-107.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size
n2006045229.pdf Accepted Manuscript application/pdf 550.28KB
Title 'Going green'?: The limitations of behaviour change programmes as a policy response to escalating resource consumption
Author(s) Moloney, S
Strengers, Y
Year 2014
Journal name Environmental Policy and Governance
Volume number 24
Issue number 2
Start page 94
End page 107
Total pages 14
Publisher John Wiley and Sons
Abstract This paper contributes to a growing body of literature highlighting the limitations of behaviour change and the emergence of a social practice approach to reframe responses to escalating resource consumption. Drawing insights from interviews with Australian households and workshops with behaviour change practitioners, we demonstrate how the 'Going Green' discourse, which focuses on targeting individuals to participate in 'easy' sustainability actions, overlooks the majority of consumption implicated in everyday practices. This leaves unchallenged the complex ways in which our lives are becoming more resource intensive. We argue for an ontological framing of social change underpinned by theories of social practice. Rather than considering policies, regulations and infrastructures involving urban form, housing, transport and infrastructure provision as 'external factors' separate from behaviour, practice theories accord them integral status in the constitution of social order and change. This represents a more challenging agenda for practitioners and governments in shifting and transforming everyday life.
Subject Environmental Sociology
Keyword(s) behaviour change
environmental responsibility
sustainable consumption
social practices
DOI - identifier 10.1002/eet.1642
Copyright notice © 2014 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment
ISSN 1756-932X
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 17 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 241 Abstract Views, 231 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 09 Sep 2014, 12:53:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us