A curriculum model to promote (chiropractic) clinical thinking with video-case annotation

Colasante, M, Kimpton, A and Hallam, J 2014, 'A curriculum model to promote (chiropractic) clinical thinking with video-case annotation' in Maree Gosper, Dirk Ifenthaler (ed.) Curriculum Models for the 21st Century: Using Learning Technologies in Higher Education, Springer, New York, United States, pp. 181-210.


Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: Book Chapters

Title A curriculum model to promote (chiropractic) clinical thinking with video-case annotation
Author(s) Colasante, M
Kimpton, A
Hallam, J
Year 2014
Title of book Curriculum Models for the 21st Century: Using Learning Technologies in Higher Education
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, United States
Editor(s) Maree Gosper, Dirk Ifenthaler
Start page 181
End page 210
Subjects Higher Education
Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
Educational Technology and Computing
Summary A progressive agenda for curriculum change in a chiropractic course in a Melbourne university involved case-based materials and online video annotation. The overall learning objective was to promote clinical thinking earlier in the undergraduate chiropractic students, which did not substantively occur until clinical placement in year 4 of the study programme. Initially the traditional lecture-centred learning mode was infused with paper-based case studies, which then evolved to video-cases and, most recently, to interactive video annotation aided by the introduction of a media annotation tool (MAT). This tool positioned the case videos into an active environment requiring small group and scaffolding activities to stimulate clinical thinking in the second year of the programme. Lectures continued, but became integrative with MAT activities and ultimately responsive to student work in MAT. The resultant integrative curriculum model unfolded over two distinct but interlinked learning cycles over the semester. As part of a larger multiple-case study, data was collected via surveys, combined observation and interview sessions, and post-subject learning artefact analysis. Student feedback was largely positive, with qualifiers such as need for both further articulation of the process and more cases. The teachers also responded positively and are currently integrating further videocases using MAT into the same subject plus within additional subjects.
Copyright notice © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014
Keyword(s) chiropractic
case-based learning
clinical thinking
video annotation
media annotation tool
small group collaboration
ISBN 9781461473657
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