'56 after '89: Re-commemorating Hungarian history after the fall of communism

Stevens, Q and Sumartojo, S 2014, ''56 after '89: Re-commemorating Hungarian history after the fall of communism', in C. Schnoor (ed.) Translation: Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Vol. 31, Auckland, New Zealand, 2-5 July 2014, pp. 355-371.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title '56 after '89: Re-commemorating Hungarian history after the fall of communism
Author(s) Stevens, Q
Sumartojo, S
Year 2014
Conference name TRANSLATION 2014
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 2-5 July 2014
Proceedings title Translation: Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Vol. 31
Editor(s) C. Schnoor
Publisher SAHANZ and Unitec ePress
Place of publication Auckland, New Zealand
Start page 355
End page 371
Total pages 17
Abstract Governments and civic groups erect public memorials in national capitals to record and legitimize selected events and people, so as to define collective history. Budapest provides a rich case study of how changing political regimes and their opponents also alter, re-interpret and remove memorials in their attempts to control national narratives and express and consolidate political authority. This paper uses archival research, interviews with memorial decisionmakers, and analysis of individual memorials to explore how various key themes of Hungarian history have been articulated through Budapest's commemorative works, and how the expression of particular commemorative subjects has been contested, modulated or repressed. Analysis explores which approaches to commemoration have remained constant throughout Hungary's several regime changes, and what broad shifts have occurred in memorial themes, forms and locations. An examination of major memorials erected, removed and replaced in Budapest up until the 1989 collapse of Communism provides a context for understanding the subsequent proliferation of memorials to the 1956 Anti-Communist Uprising and the newly-completed reconfiguration of the key national space, Kossuth Square. The paper identifies four specific dynamics in the reframing of Budapest's memorial landscape since 1989 for current consumption: decontextualization, iconoclasm, liberalization, and avoidance.
Subjects Urban Design
Social and Cultural Geography
Architectural History and Theory
Copyright notice Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
ISBN 9781927214121
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