Technology-based learning: Problematising VET students' preferences and readiness

Robertson, I 2007, 'Technology-based learning: Problematising VET students' preferences and readiness', in 10th Annual AVETRA Conference: Evolution, Revolution or Status Quo, Melbourne, Australia, 11-13 April 2009.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Technology-based learning: Problematising VET students' preferences and readiness
Author(s) Robertson, I
Year 2007
Conference name 10th Annual AVETRA Conference: Evolution, Revolution or Status Quo
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 11-13 April 2009
Proceedings title 10th Annual AVETRA Conference: Evolution, Revolution or Status Quo
Publisher AVETRA
Place of publication Australia
Abstract This paper conducts a literature survey to seek evidence that supports assumptions that vocational education and training (VET) learners have a preference for, and the readiness skills to be successful students in technology-based learning. Australian studies show that VET students value the flexibility of online learning. However, these studies assume online learning as a given rather than questioning the learners┬┐ preference for that approach. In the USA, a survey of full-time college students in the USA suggests a moderate rather than high level of preference for technology-based learning. It is shown that there is a lack of substantial evidence to sustain the assumption that contemporary learners prefer technology-based learning and argued that this claim is often overstated. Research into the design of surveys consistently identifies learner self-management and learner self-directedness as important in learner readiness for online learning. When juxtaposed with Australian research which shows that VET learners generally lack these skills the assumption that VET learners have the readiness skills for technology-based learning is placed in question. It is noted that research related to VET learner characteristics was reported in 2000. Given the claimed rapid change in generational preferences the paper proposes that this research should be repeated.
Subjects Educational Technology and Computing
Copyright notice Published under the Free for Education licence
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Created: Fri, 09 Oct 2009, 08:09:01 EST by Catalyst Administrator
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