Exploiting the facile oxidation of evaporated gold films to drive electroless silver deposition for the creation of bimetallic Au/Ag surfaces

Plowman, B, Field, M, Bhargava, S and O'Mullane, A 2014, 'Exploiting the facile oxidation of evaporated gold films to drive electroless silver deposition for the creation of bimetallic Au/Ag surfaces', ChemElectroChem, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 76-82.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Exploiting the facile oxidation of evaporated gold films to drive electroless silver deposition for the creation of bimetallic Au/Ag surfaces
Author(s) Plowman, B
Field, M
Bhargava, S
O'Mullane, A
Year 2014
Journal name ChemElectroChem
Volume number 1
Issue number 1
Start page 76
End page 82
Total pages 7
Publisher Wiley
Abstract Gold is often considered as an inert material but it has been unequivocally demonstrated that it possesses unique electronic, optical, catalytic and electrocatalytic properties when in a nanostructured form.[1] For the latter the electrochemical behaviour of gold in aqueous media has been widely studied on a plethora of gold samples, including bulk polycrystalline and single-crystal electrodes, nanoparticles, evaporated films as well as electrodeposited nanostructures, particles and thin films.[1b, 2] It is now well-established that the electrochemical behaviour of gold is not as simple as an extended double-layer charging region followed by a monolayer oxide-formation/-removal process. In fact the so-called double-layer region of gold is significantly more complicated and has been investigated with a variety of electrochemical and surface science techniques. Burke and others[3] have demonstrated that significant processes due to the oxidation of low lattice stabilised atoms or clusters of atoms occur in this region at thermally and electrochemically treated electrodes which were confirmed later by Bond[4] to be Faradaic in nature via large-amplitude Fourier transformed ac voltammetric experiments. Supporting evidence for the oxidation of gold in the double-layer region was provided by Bard,[5] who used a surface interrogation mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy to quantify the extent of this process that forms incipient oxides on the surface. These were estimated to be as high as 20% of a monolayer. This correlated with contact electrode resistance measurements,[6] capacitance measurements[7] and also electroreflection techniques.
Subject Electrochemistry
Keyword(s) Bimetallic surfaces
Electrocatalysis
Electroless deposition
Oxygen reduction
Spontaneous decoration
Single crystal surfaces
Electrocatalytic activity
Polycrystalline gold
Cyclic voltammetry
Oxygen reduction
Alkaline media
Au electrodes
Index faces
Nanoparticles behavior
DOI - identifier 10.1002/celc.201300079
Copyright notice © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN 2196-0216
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