Approaches to the downside of social capital

Moodie, N 2010, 'Approaches to the downside of social capital', in S. Velayutham, N. Ebert and S. Watkins (ed.) Proceedings of 2010 Social Causes, Private Lives: The Annual Conference of The Australian Sociological Association, TASA 2010, Sydney, Australia, 6-9 December 2010, pp. 1-17.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Approaches to the downside of social capital
Author(s) Moodie, N
Year 2010
Conference name Social Causes, Private Lives, TASA 2010 Conference
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 6-9 December 2010
Proceedings title Proceedings of 2010 Social Causes, Private Lives: The Annual Conference of The Australian Sociological Association, TASA 2010
Editor(s) S. Velayutham, N. Ebert and S. Watkins
Publisher The Australian Sociological Association
Place of publication Australia
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Abstract The idea that social capital has a 'dark side' is well established in the heterodox literature. However, interpretations of social capital based on the work of Robert Putnam and James Coleman have only started to engage with the potential negative outcomes and processes that can be involved in networks and associated norms. Recent attention to social capital's downsides justifies a review of the concept that reasserts the validity of a heterodox approach. The main benefit of this approach, most frequently associated with Pierre Bourdieu, is the construction of social capital as a value-neutral, individual level resource. I argue that Bourdieu's contribution to the understanding of social capital has been marginalized, and this framework is better placed than Robert Putnam's theories to examine questions of social and political exclusion, and the reproduction of disadvantage. Although not without limitations, as a starting point for the exploration of social capital's 'downsides', Bourdieu's framework provides the opportunity to explore processes Putnam's theories cannot engage with. Bourdieu allows an understanding of how social capital is unevenly distributed, and can only be understood contextually; embodied practices, geographical, historical, economic, social and cultural factors are critical to any understanding of social capital, particularly its 'downside'.
Subjects Sociology not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) social capital
unsocial capital
dark side
Bourdieu
Putnam
Copyright notice © The Australian Sociological Association
ISBN 9780646546285
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 187 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 15 Jan 2015, 08:26:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us