Modelling the chemical influences on bioavailability of geogenic arsenic in soils

Castlehouse, H, Osborn, A and Cripps, J 2010, 'Modelling the chemical influences on bioavailability of geogenic arsenic in soils', in R. Gilkes and N. Prakongkep (ed.) Proceedings of the 19th World Congress of Soil Science 2010 - Soil solutions for a changing world, Brisbane, Australia, 1-6 August 2010, pp. 70-73.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Modelling the chemical influences on bioavailability of geogenic arsenic in soils
Author(s) Castlehouse, H
Osborn, A
Cripps, J
Year 2010
Conference name WCSS 19
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 1-6 August 2010
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 19th World Congress of Soil Science 2010 - Soil solutions for a changing world
Editor(s) R. Gilkes and N. Prakongkep
Publisher International Union of Soil Sciences
Place of publication United States
Start page 70
End page 73
Total pages 4
Abstract Arsenic contaminated soils are a major problem worldwide and understanding how soil affects the fate of arsenic is important in determining the risk to humans who use the land. Most studies have investigated the influence of individual soil physico-chemical variables on arsenic mobility, but they are not readily extrapolated to predict the fate of arsenic in more complex soil systems. In this study the chemical controls on arsenic mobilisation were investigated using a geogenic arsenic rich soil from an allotment site in Northern England. Investigations of the distribution of arsenic suggested that the dominant factor (>70%) influencing arsenic mobility in the soils was the presence of iron oxide and hydroxide minerals. Bioavailability of arsenic in the soils was highest in the top 30 cm of the soil. Multiple regression analysis of the dataset suggested that the presence of phosphate ions increased the bioavailability of arsenic. Moreover, calcium ions increased arsenic sorption to the soil surface thereby reducing bioavailability. These findings have important implications for current land-use where applications of phosphate fertilisers may mobilise arsenic and increase its bioavailability.
Subjects Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Copyright notice © 2010 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World
ISBN 9780646537832
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