Metal/polyoxometallateamino acid as functional nanoconjugates for potential antibacterial activity

Periasamy, S, Bhargava, S and Bansal, V 2011, 'Metal/polyoxometallateamino acid as functional nanoconjugates for potential antibacterial activity', in Chemeca 2011: Engineering a Better World, Sydney, Australia, 18-21 September 2011, pp. 1971-1980.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Metal/polyoxometallateamino acid as functional nanoconjugates for potential antibacterial activity
Author(s) Periasamy, S
Bhargava, S
Bansal, V
Year 2011
Conference name Chemeca 2011: Engineering a Better World
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 18-21 September 2011
Proceedings title Chemeca 2011: Engineering a Better World
Publisher Engineers Australia
Place of publication Canberra, Australia
Start page 1971
End page 1980
Total pages 10
Abstract Tyrosine amino acid was used as a reducing and stabilizing agent to synthesise gold and silver nanoparticles. These gold and silver nanoparticles were functionalised with two polyoxometallates (POMs) namely phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) to impart antibacterial properties on the nanoparticles surface. Further these nanoconjugates were modified with cationic amino acid lysine to enhance antibacterial effects. UV-vis, TEM, AAS, ICPMA and Zeta potential measurements were carried out to characterize these gold, silver nanoparticles and their respective nanoconjugates. The antibacterial effects of these nanomaterials with different metals composition, doses (concentrations) and surface functionalisation were evaluated by colony counting method. Escherichia coli was used as a model Gram negative microorganism. Antibacterial activity of these gold or silver nanoparticles and their respective nanoconjugates were found to be dependent on the concentration of dose, metal composition and their functionalisation. Silver nanoparticles and nanoconjugates were found to have more antibacterial activity compare to gold nanoparticles and nanoconjugates. The increasing amount of the doses enhanced bactericidal action. Short incubation time (15-20 minutes) was sufficient to exhibit antibacterial activity. Lysine amino acid modified nanoconjugates exhibited excellent antibacterial activity. Application of these materials can be further expanded towards anticancer applications by non-specific or selective targeting of these materials towards cancer cells.
Subjects Macromolecular and Materials Chemistry not elsewhere classified
Copyright notice © 2011 Engineers Australia
ISBN 9780858259676
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