A phenomenology of co-designing services: the craft of embodying, enacting and entangling design

Akama, Y and Prendiville, A 2013, 'A phenomenology of co-designing services: the craft of embodying, enacting and entangling design', in Mina Dennert (ed.) Crafting the Future: Proceedings of the 10th European Academy of Design Conference, Gothenburg, Sweden, 17-19 April 2013, pp. 1-16.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title A phenomenology of co-designing services: the craft of embodying, enacting and entangling design
Author(s) Akama, Y
Prendiville, A
Year 2013
Conference name Crafting the Future: 10th European Academy of Design Conference
Conference location Gothenburg, Sweden
Conference dates 17-19 April 2013
Proceedings title Crafting the Future: Proceedings of the 10th European Academy of Design Conference
Editor(s) Mina Dennert
Publisher University of Gothenburg
Place of publication Gothenburg, Sweden
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Abstract Co-design is commonly discussed as a generic method to develop empathetic connections and understandings of people and their contexts. In this use, mastering the craft of co-design had inadvertently isolated the method from the practitioner, fragmenting its process as a series of static events or staged workshops. To counteract this occurrence, our paper 're-entangles' codesigning back into its lived and enacted contexts. We see co-designing as an embodied process of discovery and actualization, and it is an integral, on-going activity of designing services. Codesigning catalyses a transformative process in revealing and unlocking tacit knowledge, moving people along on a journey to 'make real' what proposed services might be like in the future. Codesigning plays a critical role especially when it involves the very people who are enmeshed in the realization of the proposed services itself. As such, our case study of a weekend Ordnance Survey Geovation camp, pays closer attention to how this took place and discusses the transformative process that was central to it. By taking a phenomenological perspective and building on a seminal anthropologists' work, Tim Ingold, our paper counters the limitations in service design that tends to see its process as a contained series of fixed interactions or systemized process of methods. Instead, we open it up to designing that is being and becoming, that is constantly transforming and connecting multiple entanglements.
Subjects Design Practice and Management not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Phenomenology
co-designing
transformation
methods.
Copyright notice © 2013 University of Gothenburg
ISBN 9789197954150
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