Structure and diversity of bacterial, eukaryotic and archaeal communities in glacial cryoconite holes from the Arctic and the Antarctic

Cameron, K, Hodson, A and Osborn, A 2012, 'Structure and diversity of bacterial, eukaryotic and archaeal communities in glacial cryoconite holes from the Arctic and the Antarctic', FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 82, no. 2, pp. 254-267.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Structure and diversity of bacterial, eukaryotic and archaeal communities in glacial cryoconite holes from the Arctic and the Antarctic
Author(s) Cameron, K
Hodson, A
Osborn, A
Year 2012
Journal name FEMS Microbiology Ecology
Volume number 82
Issue number 2
Start page 254
End page 267
Total pages 14
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Abstract The cryosphere presents some of the most challenging conditions for life on earth. Nevertheless, (micro)biota survive in a range of niches in glacial systems, including water-filled depressions on glacial surfaces termed cryoconite holes (centimetre to metre in diameter and up to 0.5 m deep) that contain dark granular material (cryoconite). In this study, the structure of bacterial and eukaryotic cryoconite communities from ten different locations in the Arctic and Antarctica was compared using T-RFLP analysis of rRNA genes. Community structure varied with geography, with greatest differences seen between communities from the Arctic and the Antarctic. DNA sequencing of rRNA genes revealed considerable diversity, with individual cryoconite hole communities containing between six and eight bacterial phyla and five and eight eukaryotic 'first-rank' taxa and including both bacterial and eukaryotic photoautotrophs. Bacterial Firmicutes and Deltaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, eukaryotic Rhizaria, Haptophyta, Choanomonada and Centroheliozoa, and archaea were identified for the first time in cryoconite ecosystems. Archaea were only found within Antarctic locations, with the majority of sequences (77%) related to members of the Thaumarchaeota. In conclusion, this research has revealed that Antarctic and Arctic cryoconite holes harbour geographically distinct highly diverse communities and has identified hitherto unknown bacterial, eukaryotic and archaeal taxa, therein.
Subject Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Archaea
Cryoconite
Glacier
Microbial diversity
Photoautotrophs
DOI - identifier 10.1111/j.1574-6941.2011.01277.x
Copyright notice © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies
ISSN 0168-6496
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