Bacterial water quality and network hydraulic characteristics: A field study of a small, looped water distribution system using culture-independent molecular methods

Sekar, R, Deines, P, MacHell, J, Osborn, A, Biggs, C and Boxall, J 2012, 'Bacterial water quality and network hydraulic characteristics: A field study of a small, looped water distribution system using culture-independent molecular methods', Journal of Applied Microbiology, vol. 112, no. 6, pp. 1220-1234.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Bacterial water quality and network hydraulic characteristics: A field study of a small, looped water distribution system using culture-independent molecular methods
Author(s) Sekar, R
Deines, P
MacHell, J
Osborn, A
Biggs, C
Boxall, J
Year 2012
Journal name Journal of Applied Microbiology
Volume number 112
Issue number 6
Start page 1220
End page 1234
Total pages 15
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Abstract Aims: To determine the spatial and temporal variability in the abundance, structure and composition of planktonic bacterial assemblages sampled from a small, looped water distribution system and to interpret results with respect to hydraulic conditions. Methods and Results: Water samples were collected from five sampling points, twice a day at 06:00 h and 09:00 h on a Monday (following low weekend demand) and a Wednesday (higher midweek demand). All samples were fully compliant with current regulated parameter standards. This study did not show obvious changes in bacterial abundance (DAPI count) or community structure Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis with respect to sample site and hence to water age; however, the study did show temporal variability with respect to both sampling day and sample times. Conclusions: Data suggests that variations in the bacterial assemblages may be associated with the local system hydraulics: the bacterial composition and numbers, over short durations, are governed by the interaction of the bulk water and the biofilm influenced by the hydraulic conditions. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study demonstrates general stability in bacterial abundance, community structure and composition within the system studied. Trends and patterns supporting the transfer of idealized understanding to the real world were evident. Ultimately, such work will help to safeguard potable water quality, fundamental to public health.
Subject Microbiology not elsewhere classified
Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) Biofilms
Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis
Drinking water
Enumeration
Water age
Water quality
DOI - identifier 10.1111/j.1365-2672.2012.05286.x
Copyright notice © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology
ISSN 1364-5072
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 102 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 15 Jan 2015, 13:42:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us