Impact of primary and secondary sludge mixing ratio on the apparent viscosity of blends of primary, secondary and digested sludge

Markis, F, Baudez, J, Parthasarathy, R, Slatter, P and Eshtiaghi, N 2014, 'Impact of primary and secondary sludge mixing ratio on the apparent viscosity of blends of primary, secondary and digested sludge', in Kevin Stevenson (ed.) Proceedings of the 2014 Chemeca-Processing excellence; powering our future, Perth, Australia, 28 September- 01 October 2014, pp. 1-5.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Impact of primary and secondary sludge mixing ratio on the apparent viscosity of blends of primary, secondary and digested sludge
Author(s) Markis, F
Baudez, J
Parthasarathy, R
Slatter, P
Eshtiaghi, N
Year 2014
Conference name CHEMECA 2014: 'Processing excellence; powering our future'
Conference location Perth, Australia
Conference dates 28 September- 01 October 2014
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 2014 Chemeca-Processing excellence; powering our future
Editor(s) Kevin Stevenson
Publisher Institution of Chemical Engineers
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Abstract Predicting the flow behaviour (i.e. apparent viscosity) of sludge is important in the design optimization and operation of various components of the waste water treatment process such as pumps, heat exchangers and anaerobic digesters. This study investigates the impact of primary to secondary sludge mixing ratio on the apparent viscosity of blends of primary, secondary and digested sludge. Any changes prior to and after mixing can be applied to anaerobic digester performance, most notably mixing efficiency, whereby changes in the apparent viscosity have a direct impact on the formation of dead zones (i.e. inactive volume) which leads to changes in the energy requirements necessary for efficient digester mixing. Samples of inlet sludge feeds - primary and secondary and anaerobic digested sludge - were obtained from the Mount Martha treatment plant in Victoria. An equal volume of primary sludge (4.2% TS) was added to secondary sludge (4.2% TS); digested sludge (4.2% TS) was then added to this sludge mixture at different volume ratios of primary and secondary sludge to digested sludge (0-1). Successive creep tests were performed using a stress controlled rheometer after 150s preshear and rest for each sludge sample allowing for the flow curves of each blend to be extracted from the creep data. A master curve was developed based on the flow curves of blends of primary and secondary mixture to digested sludge. The dimensionless form of the Herschel-Bulkley model was fitted to experimental data.
Subjects Rheology
Keyword(s) Sludge blends
Sludge
Rheology
Herschel-Bulkley model
Copyright notice © 2014 Institution of Chemical Engineers
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 281 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 21 Jan 2015, 13:27:00 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us