Workplace stress in the construction industry: an explanatory model

Bowen, P, Govender, R, Edwards, P and Cattell, K 2014, 'Workplace stress in the construction industry: an explanatory model', in Raiden, A and Aboagye-Nimo, E (ed.) Proceedings of the 30th Annual ARCOM Conference (Association of Researchers in Construction Management), Portsmouth, United Kingdom, 1-3 September 2014, pp. 331-340.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Workplace stress in the construction industry: an explanatory model
Author(s) Bowen, P
Govender, R
Edwards, P
Cattell, K
Year 2014
Conference name ARCOM 2014
Conference location Portsmouth, United Kingdom
Conference dates 1-3 September 2014
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 30th Annual ARCOM Conference (Association of Researchers in Construction Management)
Editor(s) Raiden, A and Aboagye-Nimo, E
Publisher Association of Researchers in Construction Management
Place of publication United Kingdom
Start page 331
End page 340
Total pages 10
Abstract The construction industry is noted for high levels of occupational stress, particularly among professional workers. Using data from 676 architects, civil engineers, quantity surveyors, and project and construction managers responding to an on-line survey in South Africa, an integrated conceptual model of occupational stress is proposed. Structural equation modeling is used to test the model iteratively. The results of the final model indicate that: psychological, physiological and sociological strain effects are the terminal consequences of occupational stress; organizational climate is largely determined by gender and job demand, control and support; age, gender, control and organizational climate are predictors of discrimination; psychological distress is predicted by age, job demand and control factors, and organizational climate; sociological stress is determined by age, job demands, discrimination and psychological distress; and age, and sociological and psychological stress effects manifest themselves as predictors of physiological stress effects. Construction employers should regularly review workload allocations, empower employees, foster a supportive work environment, conduct stress appraisals, and hold stress management workshops.
Subjects Building Construction Management and Project Planning
Keyword(s) construction professionals
predictive modeling
workplace stress
Copyright notice © 2014 Association of Researchers in Construction Management
ISBN 9780955239083
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