Drinking cultures in Vietnam and what it means for social marketing

Parker, L, Brennan, L, Pham Hung, H and Nguyen, D 2014, 'Drinking cultures in Vietnam and what it means for social marketing', in Rebekah Russell-Bennett (ed.) Proceedings of the AASM 2014 Biennial International Social Marketing Conference, Melbourne, Australia, 17 -18 July 2014, pp. 1-5.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

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Title Drinking cultures in Vietnam and what it means for social marketing
Author(s) Parker, L
Brennan, L
Pham Hung, H
Nguyen, D
Year 2014
Conference name AASM 2014 Biennial International Social Marketing Conference
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 17 -18 July 2014
Proceedings title Proceedings of the AASM 2014 Biennial International Social Marketing Conference
Editor(s) Rebekah Russell-Bennett
Publisher Australian Association of Social Marketing
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Abstract This paper presents the early results of a study into social drinking behaviours in Vietnam with a view to gain an understanding how consumption norms are established and transferred within the cultural setting. Vietnam has an established culture of drinking for celebration, social networking and business relationship enhancement (Parker, 2010, Luu, Nguyen & Nguyen 2012). Consumption levels of alcoholic beverages such as beer and wine have been documented by organisations such as the local Health Strategy and Policy Institute (HSPI) and the World Health Organization (WHO). However, consumption of homemade alcohol beverages such as rice wine, snake wine and home-brewed beer, which are popular among the working class in Vietnam, has remained largely undocumented (HSPI 2006). This is principally because it is often difficult to record and analyse something that is produced and consumed outside formal governance processes. Data on alcohol consumption in Vietnam can be problematic. For example, the Vietnamese government official statistics indicate that alcohol consumption contributes to around seven per cent of road crashes (HSPI 2006). Luu, Nguyen and Nguyen (2012) questioned the reliability of these figures given that these data are collected by the police, who do not always have the proper equipment to confirm whether alcohol was involved in a crash. The most recent data from Forensic Medicine (2001, cited in World Health Organization 2009) listed alcohol as contributory to 34 per cent of road deaths.
Subjects Marketing not elsewhere classified
Copyright notice © 2014 Australian Association of Social Marketing
ISBN 9780646932484
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