Oral Chinese herbal medicine combined with pharmacotherapy for psoriasis vulgaris: a systematic review

Zhang, S, Yu, J, Parker, S, Zhang, A, May, B, Lu, C and Xue, C 2014, 'Oral Chinese herbal medicine combined with pharmacotherapy for psoriasis vulgaris: a systematic review', International Journal of Dermatology, vol. 53, no. 11, pp. 1305-1318.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Oral Chinese herbal medicine combined with pharmacotherapy for psoriasis vulgaris: a systematic review
Author(s) Zhang, S
Yu, J
Parker, S
Zhang, A
May, B
Lu, C
Xue, C
Year 2014
Journal name International Journal of Dermatology
Volume number 53
Issue number 11
Start page 1305
End page 1318
Total pages 14
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Abstract Clinically, oral Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is widely used in the treatment of psoriasis. This review evaluates the effects of oral CHM in combination with pharmacotherapy for psoriasis vulgaris. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, CNKI, and CQVIP were searched from their inceptions to November 2012. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating CHM plus pharmacotherapy compared to pharmacotherapy were included. Data were analyzed using Review Manager 5.1.0. Seventeen RCTs were included, conducted in China, and employed a diversity of both herbal medicines and pharmacotherapies. When the meta-analyses were restricted to studies that used a well-known pharmacotherapy as the comparator with 60% or greater clinical improvement in psoriasis as the outcome, five studies used oral acitretin, one used topical calcipotriol, and one used topical clobetasol propionate as control interventions. At the end of treatment, there was a benefit for the pooled result of the five studies that compared CHM plus acitretin with acitretin alone and no serious adverse events were reported. However, none of these studies was blind, so there is considerable risk of bias in this result. In addition, there was inadequate reporting of longer-term results, so it remains unclear whether the reported effect could be maintained or whether the prolonged use of the CHM in conjunction with acitretin would be safe. The main plants used in these studies, Rehmannia glutinosa root, Salvia miltiorrhiza root, and Lithospermum erythrorhizon root, have shown anti-inflammatory and/or antiproliferative effects in experimental studies. These actions may at least partially explain the observed results.
Subject Traditional Chinese Medicine and Treatments
Dermatology
DOI - identifier 10.1111/ijd.12607
Copyright notice © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology
ISSN 0011-9059
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