The ability to execute saccades on the basis of efference copy: Impairments in double-step saccade performance in children with developmental co-ordination disorder

Katschmarsky, S, Cairney, S, Maruff, P, Wilson, P and Currie, J 2001, 'The ability to execute saccades on the basis of efference copy: Impairments in double-step saccade performance in children with developmental co-ordination disorder', Experimental Brain Research, vol. 136, no. 1, pp. 73-78.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title The ability to execute saccades on the basis of efference copy: Impairments in double-step saccade performance in children with developmental co-ordination disorder
Author(s) Katschmarsky, S
Cairney, S
Maruff, P
Wilson, P
Currie, J
Year 2001
Journal name Experimental Brain Research
Volume number 136
Issue number 1
Start page 73
End page 78
Total pages 5
Publisher Springer
Abstract The double-step saccade task (DSST) was used to test the hypothesis that children with developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) who experience deficits in motor imagery have difficulty processing the visual spatial consequences of intended movements using efference copy signals. In order to ensure that the second saccade in the DSST was executed in the absence of visual cues and had to be programmed on the basis of extra-retinal information (efference copy), we analysed only those double-step ensembles where latency plus duration of first saccades was greater than 240 ms (total presentation time of the targets). No significant differences between DCD and control children were evident on measures of latency of first saccades, intersaccadic interval and first saccade error. As predicted, children with DCD who have impaired motor imagery demonstrated specific deficits on the DSST where efference copy had been used to program the saccade sequence. More specifically, these children were less accurate in terms of final eye position on second saccades. Our results raise the possibility that abnormalities in the processing of efference copy signals could underlie motor clumsiness in the majority of children with DCD. Furthermore, the origin of this deficit in efference copy probably exists at the level of the parietal lobe.
DOI - identifier 10.1007/s002210000535
Copyright notice © 2000 Springer-Verlag
ISSN 0014-4819
Versions
Version Filter Type
Altmetric details:
Access Statistics: 176 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 09 Dec 2009, 09:40:11 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us