The role of perceived policy effectiveness in explaining climate change mitigation policy support behaviour

Ha, H and Mulye, R 2014, 'The role of perceived policy effectiveness in explaining climate change mitigation policy support behaviour', in Mike Ewing, Lelde McCoy, Fiona Newton (ed.) Proceedings of the 2014 Biennial International Social Marketing Conference (AASM 2014), Melbourne, Australia, 17-18 July 2014, pp. 1-6.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title The role of perceived policy effectiveness in explaining climate change mitigation policy support behaviour
Author(s) Ha, H
Mulye, R
Year 2014
Conference name AASM 2014: Scaling the twin peaks of rigour and relevance
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 17-18 July 2014
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 2014 Biennial International Social Marketing Conference (AASM 2014)
Editor(s) Mike Ewing, Lelde McCoy, Fiona Newton
Publisher Australian Association of Social Marketing
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Abstract Opinion surveys of the Australian public over the last few years have shown an overwhelming support for the idea that governments, through their policies, should play an important role in climate change mitigation. However, there is little agreement on exactly what form these mitigation policies should take (Nielsen, 2012; TCI, 2013). Taking the carbon tax for an instance, since the introduction of it in 2012 by the Labor government, there has been continuing public debate and controversy on the policy's cost-benefit to the public. One of the reasons for this ambivalence is perhaps due to the to the public's perceived low effectiveness of the policy. Consequently, the carbon tax is now under review in the parliament, with a strong push from the Liberal government to remove it (Daily Telegraph 2013). This paper explores the dynamics of this situation by proposing that the role of individuals' perceived policy effectiveness (PEP) plays a crucial role in driving public support for climate change mitigation policies (CCPS) - a link that has not been adequately investigated in the literature (Bostrom et al., 2012; Ellen, O'Connor, Bord, & Fisher, 1999; Stern, Dietz, Abel, Guagnano, & Kalof, 1999).
Subjects Marketing Communications
Public Policy
Copyright notice © 2014 Australian Association of Social Marketing
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