Deriving metrics of vertical structure at the plot level for use in regional characterisation of S.E. Australian forests

Wilkes, P, Jones, S, Suarez, L, Haywood, A, Soto-Berelov, M, Mellor, A, Axelsson, C and Woodgate, W 2012, 'Deriving metrics of vertical structure at the plot level for use in regional characterisation of S.E. Australian forests', in Colin Arrowsmith, Chris Bellman, William Cartwright, Karin Reinke, Mark Shortis, Mariela Soto-Berelov, Lola Suarez Barranco (ed.) Proceedings of the 2012 Geospatial Science Research 3 Symposium (GSR_2), Melbourne, Australia, 10-12 December 2012, pp. 1-11.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Deriving metrics of vertical structure at the plot level for use in regional characterisation of S.E. Australian forests
Author(s) Wilkes, P
Jones, S
Suarez, L
Haywood, A
Soto-Berelov, M
Mellor, A
Axelsson, C
Woodgate, W
Year 2012
Conference name GSR_2
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 10-12 December 2012
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 2012 Geospatial Science Research 3 Symposium (GSR_2)
Editor(s) Colin Arrowsmith, Chris Bellman, William Cartwright, Karin Reinke, Mark Shortis, Mariela Soto-Berelov, Lola Suarez Barranco
Publisher RMIT University
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Abstract Efficient characterisation of forest structure is integral to regional scale biomass and carbon stock estimation, habitat management and forest condition assessment. Key descriptors or data primitives of forest structure, such as Canopy Height (CH) and Canopy Height Profile (CHP) can be used to model indirectly measurable characteristics. Existing methods that utilise Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to estimate dominant CH and CHP are utilised at a field site in S.E. Australia. Techniques to estimate CH and CHP in the field are also presented using data from three field sites representative of sclerophyll forest in S.E. Australia. The use of different point-cloud components (e.g. first returns, first-and-last returns etc.) has little effect on either derived CH or CHP parameters. On the contrary, choice of method has a significant impact on estimates of dominant height (inter-technique range >4 m). Localised and regional structural variability can also be determined from traditional field inventory. Finally, suggestions of future research directions are presented including utilising different point cloud components; fitting multi-modal distribution function to vertical profiles; landscape scale measurements of CH and CHP; and incorporation of landscape estimates in regional modelling.
Subjects Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing
Forestry Sciences not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) LiDAR
canopy height
canopy height profile
forest inventory
regional assessment
Copyright notice © 2012 Authors
ISBN 9780978252715
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