Abstracting knowledge formation: a report on academia and publishing

James, P and McQueen-Thomson, D 2002, 'Abstracting knowledge formation: a report on academia and publishing' in S. Cooper, J. Hinkson and G. Sharp (ed.) Scholars and Entrepreneurs: The University in Crisis, Arena Printing and Publishing, Carlton, Australia, pp. 183-205.


Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: Book Chapters

Title Abstracting knowledge formation: a report on academia and publishing
Author(s) James, P
McQueen-Thomson, D
Year 2002
Title of book Scholars and Entrepreneurs: The University in Crisis
Publisher Arena Printing and Publishing
Place of publication Carlton, Australia
Editor(s) S. Cooper
J. Hinkson
G. Sharp
Start page 183
End page 205
Subjects Political Theory and Political Philosophy
Summary Considered across the long reach of history, it is evident that the dominant formation of knowledge is becoming more abstract. More recently, this process has been super-charged by a changing culture of inquiry that puts a hyper-intensified emphasis on rational codified investigation with commodifiable outcomes. This is to argue that the dominant processes that frame knowledge formation are fundamentally changing, not that all the content of knowledge is necessarily becoming more abstracted or distanced from the object of inquiry. The key distinction here, for the purpose of our argument, is between form and content.
Copyright notice © 2002 Arena Printing and Publications
ISBN 0959818162
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