Neonatal pneumococcal colonisation caused by Influenza A infection alters lung function in adult mice

FitzPatrick, M, Royce, S, Langenbach, S, McQualter, J, Reading, P, Wijburg, O, Anderson, G, Stewart, A, Bourke, J and Bozinovski, S 2016, 'Neonatal pneumococcal colonisation caused by Influenza A infection alters lung function in adult mice', Scientific Reports, vol. 6, 22751, pp. 1-12.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

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Title Neonatal pneumococcal colonisation caused by Influenza A infection alters lung function in adult mice
Author(s) FitzPatrick, M
Royce, S
Langenbach, S
McQualter, J
Reading, P
Wijburg, O
Anderson, G
Stewart, A
Bourke, J
Bozinovski, S
Year 2016
Journal name Scientific Reports
Volume number 6
Article Number 22751
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Nature
Abstract There is emerging epidemiological data to suggest that upper respiratory tract bacterial colonisation in infancy may increase the risk of developing respiratory dysfunction later in life, and respiratory viruses are known to precipitate persistent colonisation. This study utilized a neonatal mouse model of Streptococcus pneumonia (SP) and influenza A virus (IAV) co-infection, where bronchoalveolar leukocyte infiltration had resolved by adulthood. Only co-infection resulted in persistent nasopharyngeal colonisation over 40 days and a significant increase in airway resistance in response to in vivo methacholine challenge. A significant increase in hysteresivity was also observed in IAV and co-infected mice, consistent with ventilatory heterogeneity and structural changes in the adult lung. Airway hyper-responsiveness was not associated with a detectable increase in goblet cell transdifferentiation, peribronchial smooth muscle bulk or collagen deposition in regions surrounding the airways. Increased reactivity was not observed in precision cut lung slices challenged with methacholine in vitro. Histologically, the airway epithelium appeared normal and expression of epithelial integrity markers (ZO-1, occludin-1 and E-cadherin) were not altered. In summary, neonatal co-infection led to persistent nasopharyngeal colonisation and increased airway responsiveness that was not associated with detectable smooth muscle or mucosal epithelial abnormalities, however increased hysteresivity may reflect ventilation heterogeneity.
Subject Respiratory Diseases
DOI - identifier 10.1038/srep22751
Copyright notice This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution
ISSN 2045-2322
Additional Notes Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
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