Unsteady particle deposition in a human nasal cavity

Se, M, Inthavong, K and Tu, J 2009, 'Unsteady particle deposition in a human nasal cavity', in P. Witt and M. Schwarz (ed.) Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on CFD in the Minerals and Process Industries, Melbourne, Australia, 9-11 December 2009, pp. 1-6.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Unsteady particle deposition in a human nasal cavity
Author(s) Se, M
Inthavong, K
Tu, J
Year 2009
Conference name Seventh International Conference on CFD in the Minerals and Process Industries
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 9-11 December 2009
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on CFD in the Minerals and Process Industries
Editor(s) P. Witt
M. Schwarz
Publisher CSIRO
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Abstract The deposition efficiency of unsteady inhalation is investigated in present study by using computational fluid dynamics techniques. Comparison with steady inhalation is also discussed. The inspiratory cycle of a realistic unsteady inhalation profile was applied at the outlet of nasopharynx, which has the maximum flow rate of 40.3L/min. Aerodynamic particle sizes of 5ìm and 20ìm were studied in order to reflect a low and high Stokes numbered particle, respectively. Three profiles of particle deposition efficiency in the nasal cavity versus time are presented. In general, the total deposition of 5ìm was found much less than 20ìm particle. Lower deposition was achieved for 5ìm as inhalation accelerates. The first 0.2 second of the inspiratory cycle was found to be a crucial period as majority of particles deposited during the period. These particle sizes gave the highest deposition efficiency in the middle region of the nasal cavity. However, the distribution changed for large particle under steady inhalation. Comparing with its equivalent steady inhalation flow rate, the unsteady inhalation had lower deposition efficiency for both particle sizes.
Subjects Computational Fluid Dynamics
Keyword(s) CFD
computational fluid dynamics
functional materials and microsystems
Copyright notice © 2009 CSIRO Australia
ISBN 9780643098251
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