Building community in masterplanned estates: No place for culturally diverse aspirations?

Roggenbuck, C 2016, 'Building community in masterplanned estates: No place for culturally diverse aspirations?', in M. Chou (ed.) Proceedings of the 2016 Annual Conference of the Australian Sociological Association (TASA), Melbourne, Australia, 28 November - 1 December 2016, pp. 303-308.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Building community in masterplanned estates: No place for culturally diverse aspirations?
Author(s) Roggenbuck, C
Year 2016
Conference name TASA 2016: Cities and Successful Societies
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 28 November - 1 December 2016
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 2016 Annual Conference of the Australian Sociological Association (TASA)
Editor(s) M. Chou
Publisher The Australian Sociological Association
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Start page 303
End page 308
Total pages 6
Abstract Prevailing forms of developing new residential land in Australia are Masterplanned Estates, which integrate ideas of place-making and building locally-based communities within the development. At the same time these areas have been attracting an ethnically diverse population. The paper focuses on the need to address the aspirations towards local social involvement from residents with a culturally diverse background, for whom community may have a different social meaning, more specifically. Reviewing literature on the relationship between the social environment and the experience of settling for migrants' community is conceded as an enabling as well as inhibiting process. The analysis of the academic discourse on Masterplanned Estates in Australia undertaken to date emphasises that the commodification of community as a social code may constrain other forms of community and the expectations of residents' from culturally diverse backgrounds have been insufficiently considered. The paper argues that the constructed narratives of community do not necessarily reflect the diverse aspirations of residents. Therefore, more unpacking of the process of masterplanning is needed to enable a more comprehensive understanding of culturally diverse experiences and meanings of community.
Subjects Urban Sociology and Community Studies
Copyright notice © TASA 2016
ISBN 9780646964805
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