Differences in carbon source utilisation by orchid mycorrhizal fungi from common and endangered species of Caladenia (Orchidaceae)

Mehra, S, Morrison, P, Coates, F and Lawrie, A 2016, 'Differences in carbon source utilisation by orchid mycorrhizal fungi from common and endangered species of Caladenia (Orchidaceae)', Mycorrhiza, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 95-108.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Differences in carbon source utilisation by orchid mycorrhizal fungi from common and endangered species of Caladenia (Orchidaceae)
Author(s) Mehra, S
Morrison, P
Coates, F
Lawrie, A
Year 2016
Journal name Mycorrhiza
Volume number 27
Issue number 2
Start page 95
End page 108
Total pages 13
Publisher Springer
Abstract Terrestrial orchids depend on orchid mycorrhizal fungi (OMF) as symbionts for their survival, growth and nutrition. The ability of OMF from endangered orchid species to compete for available resources with OMF from common species may affect the distribution, abundance and therefore conservation status of their orchid hosts. Eight symbiotically effective OMF from endangered and more common Caladenia species were tested for their ability to utilise complex insoluble and simple soluble carbon sources produced during litter degradation by growth with different carbon sources in liquid medium to measure the degree of OMF variation with host conservation status or taxonomy. On simple carbon sources, fungal growth was assessed by biomass. On insoluble substrates, ergosterol content was assessed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The OMF grew on all natural materials and complex carbon sources, but produced the greatest biomass on xylan and starch and the least on bark and chitin. On simple carbon sources, the greatest OMF biomass was measured on most hexoses and disaccharides and the least on galactose and arabinose. Only some OMF used sucrose, the most common sugar in green plants, with possible implications for symbiosis. OMF from common orchids produced more ergosterol and biomass than those from endangered orchids in the Dilatata and Reticulata groups but not in the Patersonii and Finger orchids. This suggests that differences in carbon source utilisation may contribute to differences in the distribution of some orchids, if these differences are retained on site.
Subject Speciation and Extinction
Conservation and Biodiversity
Mycology
Keyword(s) Caladenia
Carbon nutrition
Conservation
Mycorrhiza
Orchid
Sebacinales
DOI - identifier 10.1007/s00572-016-0732-1
Copyright notice © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
ISSN 0940-6360
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