A longitudinal analysis of the influence of the neighborhood built environment on walking for transportation: The RESIDE study

Knuiman, M, Christian, H, Divitini, M, Foster, S, Bull, F, Badland, H and Giles-Corti, B 2014, 'A longitudinal analysis of the influence of the neighborhood built environment on walking for transportation: The RESIDE study', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 180, no. 5, pp. 453-461.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title A longitudinal analysis of the influence of the neighborhood built environment on walking for transportation: The RESIDE study
Author(s) Knuiman, M
Christian, H
Divitini, M
Foster, S
Bull, F
Badland, H
Giles-Corti, B
Year 2014
Journal name American Journal of Epidemiology
Volume number 180
Issue number 5
Start page 453
End page 461
Total pages 9
Publisher Oxford University Press
Abstract The purpose of the present analysis was to use longitudinal data collected over 7 years (from 4 surveys) in the Residential Environments (RESIDE) Study (Perth, Australia, 2003-2012) to more carefully examine the relationship of neighborhood walkability and destination accessibility with walking for transportation that has been seen in many cross-sectional studies. We compared effect estimates from 3 types of logistic regression models: 2 that utilize all available data (a population marginal model and a subject-level mixed model) and a third subject-level conditional model that exclusively uses within-person longitudinal evidence. The results support the evidence that neighborhood walkability (especially land-use mix and street connectivity), local access to public transit stops, and variety in the types of local destinations are important determinants of walking for transportation. The similarity of subjectlevel effect estimates from logistic mixed models and those from conditional logistic models indicates that there is little or no bias from uncontrolled time-constant residential preference (self-selection) factors; however, confounding by uncontrolled time-varying factors, such as health status, remains a possibility. These findings provide policy makers and urban planners with further evidence that certain features of the built environment may be important in the design of neighborhoods to increase walking for transportation and meet the health needs of residents.
Subject Epidemiology
Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
Urban Design
Keyword(s) Built environment
Logistic regression
Longitudinal study
Neighborhood
Transport
Urban planning
Walking
DOI - identifier 10.1093/aje/kwu171
Copyright notice © The Author 2014
ISSN 0002-9262
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