Creating safe walkable streetscapes: Does house design and upkeep discourage incivilities in suburban neighbourhoods?

Foster, S, Giles-Corti, B and Knuiman, M 2011, 'Creating safe walkable streetscapes: Does house design and upkeep discourage incivilities in suburban neighbourhoods?', Journal of Environmental Psychology, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 79-88.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Creating safe walkable streetscapes: Does house design and upkeep discourage incivilities in suburban neighbourhoods?
Author(s) Foster, S
Giles-Corti, B
Knuiman, M
Year 2011
Journal name Journal of Environmental Psychology
Volume number 31
Issue number 1
Start page 79
End page 88
Total pages 10
Publisher Academic Press
Abstract There is growing evidence that residents are more likely to walk in attractive neighbourhoods, and that negative visual cues can deter residents from engaging in physical activity. This study explored the premise that house design and upkeep could inhibit the incidence of physical disorder in suburban streets, thus contributing to a more pleasant walking environment for pedestrians. Street segments (n = 443) in new residential developments (n = 61) in Perth, Western Australia, were audited for house attributes that facilitate natural surveillance (e.g., porch/verandah) or indicate territoriality (e.g., garden/lawn upkeep), and physical incivilities. A composite index of street-level house attributes yielded highly significant associations with disorder (trend test p = 0.001) and graffiti (trend test p = 0.005), signifying that the cumulative effect of several key attributes had greater potential to discourage incivilities in the street than any single characteristic. The findings suggest house design and upkeep may contribute to the creation of safe, inviting streets for pedestrians.
Subject Epidemiology
Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
DOI - identifier 10.1016/j.jenvp.2010.03.005
Copyright notice © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN 0272-4944
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