A post-occupancy evaluation of a modular multi-residential development in Melbourne, Australia

Woo, J 2016, 'A post-occupancy evaluation of a modular multi-residential development in Melbourne, Australia', in International High-Performance Built Environment Conference - A Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 Series (SBE16), iHBE 2016, Sydney, Australia, 17-18 November 2016, pp. 1-7.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title A post-occupancy evaluation of a modular multi-residential development in Melbourne, Australia
Author(s) Woo, J
Year 2016
Conference name International High-Performance Built Environment Conference - A Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 Series (SBE16), iHBE 2016
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 17-18 November 2016
Proceedings title International High-Performance Built Environment Conference - A Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 Series (SBE16), iHBE 2016
Publisher Elsevier Ltd
Place of publication Australia
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Abstract Modular construction has been promoted to minimise the environmental impacts such as construction material use and waste, embodied energy and carbon emissions as well as construction time and cost reduction. Although the main focus has been on the construction technology, waste minimisation, energy and material efficiency and thermal performance of modular construction, limited attention has been paid to the building occupants. This paper aims to evaluate the resident lived experience of a modular multi-residential development in inner Melbourne. The case study building accommodates a total of 199 apartments and commercial spaces, and to date, it is the largest modular construction building in Victoria. A POE was conducted using the BUS methodology. Overall building design, thermal comfort, noise, lighting and personal control over the indoor environment were evaluated on a seven-point Semantic differential scale. Although the building occupant survey showed a high level of satisfaction with overall building design and performance, two main issues, 'thermal discomfort in summer' and 'noise from outside' were identified. Overheating in summer is not clearly understood in this study, however, it could be interpreted that passive design strategies such as cross ventilation and landscaped shared open space increased noise. A further research on the effects of building design on occupants such as engineered light-weight concrete floor, prefabricated building façade, cross-ventilation, operable openings and the cooling systems of the individual apartments is necessary to resolve the issues and to examine whether the poor thermal performance in summer could be related to modular construction.
Subjects Building Science and Techniques
Keyword(s) post-occupancy evaluation (POE)
passive design
modular
multi-residential
building occupants
Copyright notice © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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