Western diet chow consumption in rats induces striatal neuronal activation while reducing dopamine levels without affecting spatial memory in the radial arm maze

Nguyen, J, Ali, S, Kosari, S, Woodman, O, Spencer, S, Killcross, S and Jenkins, T 2017, 'Western diet chow consumption in rats induces striatal neuronal activation while reducing dopamine levels without affecting spatial memory in the radial arm maze', Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, vol. 11, 22, pp. 1-10.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

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Title Western diet chow consumption in rats induces striatal neuronal activation while reducing dopamine levels without affecting spatial memory in the radial arm maze
Author(s) Nguyen, J
Ali, S
Kosari, S
Woodman, O
Spencer, S
Killcross, S
Jenkins, T
Year 2017
Journal name Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
Volume number 11
Article Number 22
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Abstract Rats fed high fat diets have been shown to be impaired in hippocampal-dependent behavioral tasks, such as spatial recognition in the Y-maze and reference memory in the Morris water maze (MWM). It is clear from previous studies, however, that motivation and reward factor into the memory deficits associated with obesity and high-fat diet consumption, and that the prefrontal cortex and striatumand neurotransmitter dopamine play important roles in cognitive performance. In this series of studies we extend our research to investigate the effect of a high fat diet on striatal neurochemistry and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task, a paradigm highly reliant on dopamine-rich brain regions, such as the striatum after high fat diet consumption. Memory performance, neuronal activation and brain dopaminergic levels were compared in rats fed a "Western" (21% fat, 0.15% cholesterol) chow diet compared to normal diet (6% fat, 0.15% cholesterol)-fed controls. Twelve weeks of dietary manipulation produced an increase in weight in western diet-fed rats, but did not affect learning and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task. Concurrently, there was an observed decrease in dopamine levels in the striatum and a reduction of dopamine turnover in the hippocampus in western diet-fed rats. In a separate cohort of rats Fos levels were measured after rats had been placed in a novel arena and allowed to explore freely. In normal rats, this exposure to a unique environment did not affect neuronal activation. In contrast, rats fed a western diet were found to have significantly increased Fos expression in the striatum, but not prefrontal cortex or hippocampus. Our study demonstrates that while western diet consumption in rats produces weight gain and brain neuronal and neurotransmitter changes, it did not affect performance in the delayed spatial win-shift paradigm in the
Subject Central Nervous System
Keyword(s) Cognition
Dopamine
High fat diet
Neuronal activation
Spatial memory
Striatum
Western diet
DOI - identifier 10.3389/fnbeh.2017.00022
Copyright notice © 2017 Nguyen, Ali, Kosari, Woodman, Spencer, Killcross and Jenkins. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
ISSN 1662-5153
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