Why politics and context matter in conservation policy

Damiens, F, Mumaw, L, Backstrom, A, Bekessy, S, Coffey, B, Faulkner, R, Garrard, G, Hardy, M, Kusmanoff, A, Mata, L, Rickards, L, Selinske, M, Torabi, N and Gordon, A 2017, 'Why politics and context matter in conservation policy', Global Policy, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 253-256.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

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Title Why politics and context matter in conservation policy
Author(s) Damiens, F
Mumaw, L
Backstrom, A
Bekessy, S
Coffey, B
Faulkner, R
Garrard, G
Hardy, M
Kusmanoff, A
Mata, L
Rickards, L
Selinske, M
Torabi, N
Gordon, A
Year 2017
Journal name Global Policy
Volume number 8
Issue number 2
Start page 253
End page 256
Total pages 4
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Abstract Kareiva and Fuller (2016) consider the future prospects for biodiversity conservation in the face of the profound disruptions of the Anthropocene. They argue that more flexible and entrepreneurial approaches to conservation are needed. While some of the approaches they promote may work in particular situations, we believe their proposal risks unintended and detrimental social and ecological consequences by presenting them as global solutions to complex political, economic, social and ethical problems that are context-dependent. Here we argue that the authors inadequately considers the following core issues of biodiversity conservation, namely: (1) the structural causes of biodiversity depletion and the responsibilities of key actors; (2) the questions around what should be conserved, the processes by which biodiversity is valued, and who has the legitimate authority to value it; (3) the fact that new tools, technologies and innovative approaches are unsuitable as guiding principles to solve complex, context-dependent social-ecological problems; (4) the challenges of choosing relevant interventions, given experts' limited ability to 'manage for change and evolution'; and (5) the risks associated with promoting a utilitarian approach and a neoliberal governance model for conservation at the global scale.
Subject Environment Policy
Conservation and Biodiversity
Keyword(s) Conservation policy
biodiversity
DOI - identifier 10.1111/1758-5899.12415
Copyright notice © 2017 University of Durham and John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.
ISSN 1758-5899
Additional Notes This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Damiens, F, Mumaw, L, Backstrom, A, Bekessy, S, Coffey, B, Faulkner, R, Garrard, G, Hardy, M, Kusmanoff, A, Mata, L, Rickards, L, Selinske, M, Torabi, N and Gordon, A 2017, 'Why politics and context matter in conservation policy', Global Policy, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 253-256. , which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12415. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
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