There are always two sides to a story: the use of social dramas as a mode of data analysis in information systems

Peszynski, K, Corbitt, B and Coulthard, D 2005, 'There are always two sides to a story: the use of social dramas as a mode of data analysis in information systems', in B. Campbell, J. Underwood and D. Bunker (ed.) Proceedings of the 16th Australasian Conference on Information Systems (ACIS), Manly, NSW, Australia, 30 November - 2 December 2005.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title There are always two sides to a story: the use of social dramas as a mode of data analysis in information systems
Author(s) Peszynski, K
Corbitt, B
Coulthard, D
Year 2005
Conference name 16th Australasian Conference on Information Systems (ACIS)
Conference location Manly, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 30 November - 2 December 2005
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 16th Australasian Conference on Information Systems (ACIS)
Editor(s) B. Campbell, J. Underwood and D. Bunker
Publisher University of Technology Sydney
Place of publication Sydney, Australia
Abstract With the continually evolving social nature of information systems research there is a need to identify different 'modes of analysis' (Myers, 1997) to uncover our understanding of the complex, messy and often chaotic nature of human factors. One suggested mode of analysis is that of social dramas, a tool developed in the anthropological discipline by Victor Turner. The use of social dramas also utilises the work by Goffman (1959; 1997) and enables the researcher to investigate events from the front stage, reporting obvious issues in systems implementation, and from the back stage, identifying the hidden aspects of systems implementation and the underpinning discourses. A case study exploring the social dramas involved in systems selection and implementation has been provided to support the use of this methodological tool.
Subjects Information Systems not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) system selection and implementation
social drama
discourse
IS methodologies
politics
power
Copyright notice © 2005 The Authors
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