Expectation reasoning using regret and disappointment

Tran, V, Harland, J and Hamilton, M 2004, 'Expectation reasoning using regret and disappointment', in Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Valencia, Spain, 22-27 August 2004, pp. 74-78.


Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Conference Papers

Title Expectation reasoning using regret and disappointment
Author(s) Tran, V
Harland, J
Hamilton, M
Year 2004
Conference name European Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Conference location Valencia, Spain
Conference dates 22-27 August 2004
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Publisher IOS Press
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Start page 74
End page 78
Total pages 5
Abstract A critical aspect of an agent system is the ability to deal with unexpected situations to determine an appropriate course of action in a changing environment. In this paper, we investigate the incorporation of the mental attitudes of regret and disappointment (which have been studied by economists using utility theory) into the agent's reasoning system in order to improve its ability to deal with unexpected events. Mental attitudes in agent systems have generally been expressed in modal logics, such as the Belief-Desire-Intention (BDI) logic and epistemic logic, and, more recently, in a logic of expectation and observation. We show how regret and disappointment can be naturally integrated into a framework based on the attitudes of expectation and observation, and describe some key properties of the system.
Subjects Artificial Intelligence and Image Processing not elsewhere classified
Keyword(s) artificial intelligence
mental attitudes
expectation
reasoning
agent systems
Copyright notice ©2004 T. Vu, J. Harland and M. Hamilton
Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 191 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 09 Aug 2010, 09:40:26 EST by Catalyst Administrator
© 2014 RMIT Research Repository • Powered by Fez SoftwareContact us