Characterisation of the correlation between standing lordosis and degenerative joint disease in the lower lumbar spine in women and men: a radiographic study.

Murray, K, Le Grande, M, de Mues, A and Azari, M 2017, 'Characterisation of the correlation between standing lordosis and degenerative joint disease in the lower lumbar spine in women and men: a radiographic study.', BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, vol. 18, pp. 330-337.


Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Journal Articles

Title Characterisation of the correlation between standing lordosis and degenerative joint disease in the lower lumbar spine in women and men: a radiographic study.
Author(s) Murray, K
Le Grande, M
de Mues, A
Azari, M
Year 2017
Journal name BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Volume number 18
Start page 330
End page 337
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd
Abstract Background: Degenerative joint disease (DJD) in the lumbar spine is a common condition that is associated with chronic low back pain. Excessive loading of lumbar joints is a risk factor for DJD. Changes in lumbar lordosis significantly redistribute the forces of weight-bearing on the facet joints and the intervertebral discs. However, the relationship between lumbar lordosis and DJD has not been characterized in men and women. Methods: We characterised the correlation between standing lumbar lordosis and DJD in standing radiographic images from 301 adult female and male chiropractic patients. DJD was rated using the Kellgren-Lawrence scale, and lordosis was measured using the Cobb angle. Linear and curvilinear correlations were investigated while controlling for age and sex. Results: We found a highly significant curvilinear correlation between lordosis and DJD of the lower lumbar spine in both sexes, but especially in women, irrespective of the effects of age. We found the effect size of lordosis on lower lumbar DJD to be between 17.4 and 18.1% in women and 12.9% in older men. In addition, lordosis of 65 (95% CI 55.3-77.7) and 68 (98% CI 58.7-73.3) degrees were associated with minimal DJD in the lower lumbar spine of women and men respectively, and were therefore considered 'optimal'. This optimal lordotic angle was 73 (95% CI 58.8-87.2) degrees in older men. Conclusions: Both hypo- and hyper-lordosis correlate with DJD in the lumbar spine, particularly in women and in older men. These findings may well be of relevance to spinal pain management and spinal rehabilitation.
Subject Rheumatology and Arthritis
Chiropractic
Physiotherapy
Keyword(s) Lordosis
Lumbar region
Osteoarthritis
DOI - identifier 10.1186/s12891-017-1696-9
Copyright notice © The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
ISSN 1471-2474
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